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Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Dick Winslow Came From A Talented Family

Dick Winslow's parents were Winonah Breazeale (a writer) and Sidney K. Johnson. Graduated from Belmont High School in Los Angeles, and first appeared in films when he was five years old. Appeared in the play "Silver Thread" at the Egan Theatre in Los Angeles, and in "The Emperor's Clothes" at the Belmont Theatre in Los Angeles.
He played the pipe organ, piano, marimba, bag pipes, accordion, drums, saxophone and other wind instruments. Had appeared in 75 films by 1934.
- IMDb Mini Biography By: Les Adams

Dick Winslow is Stan's 5th cousins 2 times removed on the Breazeale side so a distant relative. Let's start with his birth family.

Sidney Kenneth Johnson, Sr. was born 11/8/1884 in Mayville, Traill County, North Dakota. He married Wynonah Breazeale.

Wynonah Breazeale was born to Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Sr. (1856-1893) and Cammilla Lachs. Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Sr. was the son of Louis Winter Wood Breazeale, Sr. (1827-1891) and Adeline Catherine Prudhomme. Louise Winter Wood Breazeale, Sr. was the son of Blount Baker Breazeale, Sr. (1800-1846) and Mary Manette Winter. Blount Baker Breazeale, Sr. was the son of Drury Woods Breazeale (1768-1834) and Rhoda Baker. Drury Woods Breazeale was the son of Willis Breazeale, Sr. and Sarah Woods.

Willis Breazeale, Sr. (1738-1794) and Sarah Woods also had George Washington Breazeale (1780-1850) and Stan is descended from them. They are the common ancestors of Stan and Dick Winslow.

The interesting thing about this branch of the Breazeales is they left South Carolina. Drury Woods Breazeale was born Abt. 1768 in Long Cane Creek, Abbeville County, SC. Stan's line stayed in South Carolina. Drury Breazeale married Rhoda Baker in 1786 in Port Gibson Parish, Louisiana. In the 1790 U.S. Census they are back in SC but in 1805, they are in the area of what would become Jefferson County, Mississippi. In 1810 they are in Claiborne County, MS where Rhoda Baker Breazeale died. Drury then married Elizabeth Sparks who died in 1816. He married a third time to Mary Laura Barrs in Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. He died in 1834 in Port Gibson, Claiborne County, MS so he traveled around a bit between Louisiana and Mississippi. He was a lawyer and owned a considerable amount of property in Mississippi and Louisiana by the time he died. His will gave freedom and transportation to his 180 slaves but his children contested the will and the court declared it null and void so the slaves remained on the plantation.

Drury's son, Blount Baker Breazeale lived in Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. The family seems to have established there. He married Mary Manette Winter (1808-1899) in 1826. they had 3 children: Louis Winter Wood Breazeale, Sr., Walter Overton Breazeale, Blount Baker Breazeale, Jr.

Louis Winter Wood Breazeale, Sr. was born 9/5/1827 in Hot Springs, Garland County, AR. But he lived in Natchitoches, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. He married Adeline Catherine Prudhomme (1836-1878) on 1/16/1865 in Natchitoches Parish, LA. they had 11 children: Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Sr., Pierre Phanor Breazeale, Upshur Payne Breazeale, W.P. Breazeale, Winter Wood Breazeale, Jr., Marie Lise Breazeale, Maude Manette Breazeale, Mable Josephine May Breazeale, Joseph Malcom Breazeale, Drury Wood Breazeale, Ross Edmond Breazeale. Louise Winter Wood Breazeale, Sr. married 2nd Irene Amelie Metoyer on 2/27/1882. Louis Winter Wood Breazeal, Sr. served in the C.S.A. LA 3rd Infantry Regiment, Co. G, Captain during the War of Northern Aggression. He died 3/10/1891 in Natchitoches, LA.

Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Sr. was born 11/13/1856 in LA. He married Cammilla Lachs (aka Cammilla Loch) (DOB 1/10/1865 in New Orleans, LA to Simon Lachs (Prussia/Bavaria/Germany) and Regina Seesel (Prussia/Bavaria/Germany); DOD 1956 in Natchitoches Parish, LA).

Cammilla's parents died when she was just 7 and 8 years old. She and the other young sister, Violet, moved in with their older sister, Joanna Lachs who was married to Edward Phillips.

Cammilla was well educated. She attended Mansfield Female College, 101 Monroe Street, Mansfield, DeSoto County, LA which was the first women's institute of higher learning west of the Mississippi River. Mansfield Female College Museum is located about a half-hour's drive south of Shreveport. Established by the Methodist Church in the 1850s.

She got her Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts at Millersburg College, Millersburg, Bourbon County, KY. Millersburg Male and Female Collegiate Institution was established in 1856. In 1860 it became the Millersburg Female College, for women, and the Kentucky Wesleyan College, for men. Kentucky Wesleyan College moved to Winchester in 1890. The Millersburg Female College became Millersburg College in 1915. In 1931 it was bought by the Millersburg Military Institute.

She married Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Sr. on 2/2/1886 in Natchitoches, LA.

They had 4 children: Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Jr. (married Nita Sims and was a lawyer), Carmen Camilla Breazeale (never married and helped manage the newspaper), Wynonah Breazeale and Regina Seesel Breazeale (married Marcel Joseph "Jack" Durand and was a music teacher). Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Jr. died 8/19/1893 in Natchitoches Parish, LA.

The Times, Shreveport, LA, 8/23/1893, Pg 4

Hopkins Payne Breazeale, Sr. was the editor and proprietor of the Natchitoches Enterprise, the local newspaper. When he died, Cammilla Lachs Breazeale took over the newspaper after he died in 1893. She ran it until she retired in 1950 with her daughter Carmen Breazeale. Carmen took over when her mother retired and sold the newspaper in 1951.

The Donaldsonville Chief, Donaldsonville, LA, 4/8/1916, Pg 2

The Donaldsonville Chief, Donaldsonville, LA, 5/5/1917, Pg 2, Louisiana Press Convention

The Times, Shreveport, LA, 8/8/1948, Pg 10

The Times, Shreveport, LA, 8/6/1951, Pg 4

The Town Talk, Alexandria, LA, 9/13/1951, Pg 8

The Times, Shreveport, LA, 1/2/1956, Pg 1



Wynonah Breazeale was born 1/18/1889 in Natchitoches Parish, LA. She married Sidney Kenneth Johnson on 8/24/1911 in Natchitoches, LA. Sidney Johnson, Sr. was born 11/8/1884 in Mayville, Traill County, ND.

The Natchitoches, Natchitoches, LA, 8/11/1911, Pg 5


The Jennings Daily Times-Recorder, Jennings, LA, 8/26/1911, Pg 1

They had 7 children:
1) Sidney Kenneth Johnson, Jr. (DOB 11/14/1912 in Jefferson Davis Parish, LA; DOD 11/1/1974 in Los Angeles County, CA. Married Kathryn Hines.

2) Richard "Dick" Winslow Johnson (DOB 3/25/1915 in Jennings, Jefferson Davis Parish, LA; DOD 2/7/1991 in North Hollywood, Los Angeles County, CA).

3) Cammilla Breazeale Johnson (DOB 3/1/1918 in Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 8/4/1999 in North Hollywood, Los Angeles County, CA) married Edward St. Clair Jones (DOB 4/9/1908 in Wisconsin; DOD 10/26/1970 in Los Angeles County, CA).

4) Seessel Anne Johnson (DOB 12/28/1920 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 1/13/1956 in Whittier, Los Angeles County, CA) married Custer Carleton Lang (DOB 11/10/1922 in Mandan, Morton County, NC; DOD 1/4/1996 in Los Angeles County, CA).

5) Carmencita Breazeale Johnson (DOB 3/31/1923 in Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 9/26/2000 in ? ) married Jack Lucas Robertson (DOB Abt. 1922 in Fremon, Dodge County, NE; DOD 8/14/2003 in Ojai, Ventura County, Ca).

6) Cullen Bertram Johnson (DOB 8/30/1926 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; DOD 6/2/2009 in Portlant, Multnomah County, OR) married Joanne M. Corthers.

7) Payne Breazeale Johnson (DOB 6/2/1930 in Los Angeles County, CA; DOD ? in ? ) married Alice Blakely Winn (DOB 11/16/1933 in San Diego Count, CA; DOD ? . They were married 7/30/1955 in San Diego County, Ca and divorced 4/16/1980.


The Jennings Daily Times-Record, Jennings, LA, 11/16/1915, Pg 4

Sidney Kenneth Johnson, Sr. was an auditor at The Los Angeles Times for 26 years and then became the Manager of The Los Angeles Times before he retired. Wynonah was a writer and a reporter for The Los Angeles Times for 15 years. Then she took over managing her seven children's acting careers.

1920 U.S. Census of Rome Ave, Los Angeles Assembly District 61, Los Angeles County, California; Roll: T625_105; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 113, "Sidney K. Johnson"
Sidney K. Johnson, Head, Rents home, M(ale), W(hite), 34 yrs old, Married, Can read and write, Born in ND, Both parents born in Norway, Oil Operator in Oil fields
Wenona Johnson (sic), Wife, F, W, 25 yrs old, Married, Can read and write, Born in LA, Both parents born in LA
Kenneth Johnson, Son, M, W, 7 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Born in LA, Father born in ND, Mother born in LA
Dick W. Johnson, Son, M, W, 4 yrs 9/12 mos old, Single, Born in LA, Father born in ND, Mother born in LA
Carmilla Johnson, Daughter, F, W, 1 yr 8/12 mos old, Single, born in CA, Father born in ND, Mother born in LA
Bessie G. Seals, Maid, F, B(lack), 50 yrs old, Widowed, Born in MO, Both parents born in KY, Maid for private family

1930 U.S. Census of West 22nd St, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California; Page: 8B; Enumeration District: 0243; FHL microfilm: 2339877, "Sidney C. Johnson" (sic)
Sidney C. Johnson, Head, Owns home valued at $5,000, owns radio set, M(ale), W(hite), 45 yrs old, Married at age 27 yrs old, Can read and write, Born in Minnesota, Both parents born in Minnesota, Auditor newspaper
Wynonah Johnson, Wife, F, W, 35 yrs old, Married at age 17 yrs old, Can read and write, Born in LA, Both parents born in LA
Sidney Johnson, Jr., Son, M, W, 17 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Born in LA, Father born in Minnesota, Mother born in LA
Richard W. Johnson, Son, M, W, 15 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Born in LA, Father born in Minnesota, Mother born in LA
Camilla B. Johnson, Daughter, F, W, 12 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Born in CA, Father born in Minnesota, Mother born in LA
Seesel A. Johnson, Daughter, F, W, 9 yrs old, Attends school, Born in CA, Father born in Minnesota, Mother born in LA
Carman Johnson, Daughter, F, W, 6 yrs old, Attends school, Born in CA, Father born in Minnesota, Mother born in LA
Cullen Johnson, Son, M, W, 3 yrs old, Born in CA, Father born in Minnesota, Mother born in LA

1940 U.S. Census of 333 South Oxford Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California; Roll: m-t0627-00401; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 60-288, "Sidney K. Johnson"
Sidney K. Johnson, Owns home valued at $10,000, Head, M(ale), W(hite), 55 yrs old, Married, Attended College 3 yrs, Born in ND, Lived in same place in 1935, Bookkeeper newspaper, $2,250 Income
Wynonah B. Johnson, Wife, F, W, 51 yrs old, Married, Attended college 4 yrs, Born in LA, Lived in the same place in 1935
Cammilla B. Johnson, Daughter, F, W, 22 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Attended college 3 yrs, Born in CA, Lived in the same place in 1935, Actress in motion pictures, $350 Income
Seesel Anne Johnson, Daughter, F, W, 19 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Attended college 3 yrs, Born in CA, Lived in the same place in 1935, Actress in motion pictures, $248 Income
Carmencita B. Johnson, Daughter, F, W, 17 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Attended High school 4 yrs, Actress in motion pictures, $166 Income
Cullen B. Johnson, Son, M, W, 13 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Attended thru 8th grade, Born in Ca, Lived in the same place in 1935
Payne B. Johnson, Son, M, W, 9 yrs old, Single, Attends school, Attended thru 4th grade, Born in CA

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 8/8/1924, Pg 23


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 9/14/1924, Pg 30
Gifted Son of Gifted Line
Dick Winslow, Juvenile Reporter, Actor, Musician, Termed Marvel of Child Training
By Claire Forbes Crane
There are two kinds of gifted children-those who are remarkable despite their family-and those who are remarkable because of family. After a very few minutes conversation the other day, I at once claimed Dick Winslow, 5-year-old juvenile reporter, among the latter.
Dick came into the studio with his mother. Being old friends, there was no formality between us, and after accepting the offer of a large dill pickle, Dick retired into a corner leaving me with a slender black-eyed woman of whom he is a vest pocket edition.
Forgetting, as usual, that it was as interviewer, mother and I sat down and fell to chatting as women will. The first thing I knew Mrs. Johnson (that's Dickie's last name) was painting a fascinating picture of home life as it should be lived.
Five Of Them
"You know," she went on in her soft southern voice, "there are five of them-another boy and three girls. I guess Dickie comes by his talent honestly enough. My mother has a newspaper in Louisiana. I, myself, have been a newspaper woman all my life, and my godmother is Dorothy Dix.
"Dickie wrote his first interview when he was 3, with Mary Pickford. At the age of 5 1-2 he interviewed her again and since then has become her favorite reporter. Mary says of Dickie, 'He is the only interviewer I ever hug.'"
As the years have gone by, not a famous personage has passed through the city who has not granted Dick a personal interview. One of the most intimate friends is Madame Pavlov.
Film Work Helps
"Of course," went on Mrs. Johnson, at my urgent request not to stop talking, "being in motion pictures has helped tremendously. Dick Winslow is more photographed than any other boy except Jackie Cougan. Jackie and he are warm friends and often work together.
"How polished Dick's manners are, Mrs. Johnson," I interrupted. "Has it been difficult to bring him up?"
"Oh no," answered his mother, with a smile, "You see, Dick had a genuine southern mammy, who taught him that the worse other people behaved around him, the better bred he must be! I never say don't to Dickie. I merely give him an idea of what I wish him to be, and that is sufficient."
"Tell me about the other children" I asked quickly as Mrs. Johnson shewed signs of rebelling at my greedy ears.
"They are all dears," was the enthusiastic reply. "Kenneth is a year older than Dick. I read French to them for an hour every night. The two boys adore their little sisters and learn to count in French by brushing each sister's hair 100 strokes before going to bed.
Boost For Doug
"For a long time we thought Dickie would be a musician. he plays the violin, drums, harp and ells and won the music memory contest this year in Los Angeles."
By this time Dick had finished the pickle and I inveigled him over to my lap. "Who do you like to interview best, Dick," I asked. "Douglas Fairbanks," was the prompt reply. "'cause he is a philosopher and always have something to remember." (Mr. Fairbanks should be proud of that.)
Intent on duty I probed again. "Who do you like best of all the famous people you know?" "Mother," said Dickie with an air of finality.
"We have such good times at home. Sometimes when she is late we boys go into the kitchen and cook dinner and have it all ready when she gets home, even to placecards. You see I have a cookbook of celebrities recipes and sometimes we have spaghetti a la Rupert Hughes or salad a la Colleen Moore.
Poem Every Day
"I write a poem to mother every day. There is one thing, thought that I do miss, and that is if she is not home to hear my prayers at night. But if she's too late, I write 'em on paper and put 'em under her pillow."
I could only hug Dickie. Something hurt my throat, and he wriggled from my restraining grasp. "I haven't written my poem for today, so I'll do it now and you can publish it." Within two minutes dick produced the following and we offer it as the greatest proof as to whose hand guides the nation:
"I love my mother best of all
Of all kind of persons,
You know she has all us five kids
Whom she is always nursin'.
She always is so kind and good
In every thought or way-
So I think the nieces holiday
Is always 'Mother's Day.'"

The Times, Shreveport, LA, 4/8/1926, Pg 5
"Drusilla's Millions" Presented at Normal
Natchitoches, La., April 7 (Special)
The auditorium at the State Normal College, with a capacity of half the students, was jammed almost beyond the limit of safety Saturday night, when Prof. George Williamson, who has charge of the entertainments presented "Drusilla's Millions," with Misses Camilla Breazeale Johnson, Seessel Ann Johnson and Carmencita Johnson in the cast.
The three Misses Johnson are granddaughters of Mrs. Camilla Breazeale and the late Hopkins Payne Breazeale, and grandnieces of Phanor and Upshur P. Breazeale, of Natchitoches. Their mother is Mrs. Winona Breazeale Johnson, of Los Angeles. They have relatives all over Louisiana and their work in the moving picture will be seen by their uncle, Payne Breazeale, of Baton Rouge; their grand uncle, Ross Breazeale of New Orleans, and many others of the family.
The Johnson children have appeared with Lillian Gish, Mary Carr, Mary Pickford, Harry Carey, Tom Mix, Claire Windsor, Dorothy McKall, Richard Barthelmess, and others.

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 5/3/1928, Pg 28, article written by Wynonah Johnson


The Los Angeles Times, 9/29/1928, Pg 24
They're Quite the Whole Thing When They're Before Kleigs
Bebe Daniels entertains Mrs. Wynonah Johnson and her six young Johnsons at the Paramount studie in Hollywood. From left to right, the noted Johnson family, one of the busiest in the film capital, reads: Dick Winslow (Johnson) 12; Kenneth, 15; Seessel Ann, 6; Cullen, 19 months; Carmencita, 4, and Camilla, 8.
In Hollywood there is a family with six children who all have been started on the road to stardom in films through the success of their mother in crashing the studio gates. She is Mrs. Wynonah Johnson.
Due to reverses caused by the war, which ruined a colonization scheme in Mexico for Sidney K. Johnson, his wife used her early newspaper training to obtain a position on a paper. She wrote some fiction and sold most of it.
While the family was living on Mt. Washington, Eugene Manlove Rhodes, cowboy authors, learned of Mrs. Johnson's stories and arranged a meeting between her and Harry Carey, film actor.
Carey met the Johnson children and later bought a desert story from Mrs. Johnson. It was Carey who made the suggestion to start her six children in pictures and Camilla, 8 years of age, was given a small role.
That was five years ago. Today all six children might be called screen veterans. The others are Dicl Winslow, 12; Kenneth, 15; Seessel Ann, 6; Culen, 19 months, and Carmencita, 4. Cullen, the youngest has taken part already in 50 productions.
In spite of this success in the silent drama, Mrs. Johnson said yesterday that her children will not be permitted to follow acting careers permanently.
The work they are now doing in pictures, she said, will provide the money for them to achieve success in other lines in the future. This money, she stated, is being laid away for their education.


The Los Angeles Times, 12/10/1928, Pg 21
Johnson Family Returns to Hollywood
Sidney K. and Wynonah Johnson with their sextet of children, all experienced in motion-picture work.
Six veteran screen actors arrived here yesterday traveling on half-fare tickets; in other words the Johnson family came home to Hollywood.
The railroad was not being cheated as the six veteran thespians of the Johnson family are the six children of Mrs. Wynonah Johnson, screenwriter, and Sidney K. Johnson. All of them except the youngest, Cullen, who is "Buttercup" in the Toots and Casper comedies, have been acting for at least five years.
The family, or troupe, left Hollywood six weeks ago to visit Mrs. Johnson's old home at Jennings, La., and then to see Mrs. Johnson's mother at Natchitoches, where she has been a newspaper woman for forty years.


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 8/16/1931, Pg 39
Now these contracts are sort of secret, the reason wherefore being that if one movie mamma reads that another movie mamma's lambkin is getting more than her own, appalling things happen at the studio.
However, Wynonah Johnson, the writer, who has seven babes, has three of them who have won movie success-Dick Winslow, who did so well in "Tom Sawyer," and "Seed" (he was the baby who was always getting left out of going places); Carmencita Johnson, aged 7, who amongst many pictures, will be seen as Greta Garbo at the age of 5 in "Susan Lennox" (Garbo chose her, her very own self); and the baby, 1 year old, who has already played bits in several pictures and will be seen in Billie Dove's "The Age for Love"... one of those coo-ey good-natured babies that everybody adores.
Now Wynonah's babes are not under contract but Dickie and Carmencita both get $150 a week. The baby gets anywhere from $7.50 to $15 a day. When Dicky Moore, now under contract to First National, worked with Dickie Winslow in "Seed" he received $200 a week so his contract with the studio is likely to be a bit better than that. Junior Coghlan, whose stock is rising, received $75 a day in a Bobby Jones golf picture, while Dickie Winslow, playing the same sort of role with the same number of lines, only received $25 a day. But Wynonah is philosophical about these little discrepancies and declines to be jealous. Many children receive $100 a day, when it's just by the picture. But Georgie Ernest, for instance, just acquired by First National and to be seen in "The Star Witness" along with Dicky Moore, probably gets about $200 a week under contract. Junior Durkin, it is surmised, has a contract value since "Huckleberry Finn" of near $500 a week.
Actually these studio children are under amazing discipline, The dear kids have to sit around doing nothing for hours, have to hop in and feel sad or playful or merry at a moment's notice, have to wear heavy, stuffy clothes on hot days and skimpy chilly ones on cold days, but you rarely hear a complaint. They are a good-tempered bunch of youngsters, who understand fully that temperamental stars are persona non grata around studios. And they can act. Oh, how they can act! Contracts are not just being chucked around at any bright lambkin that mamma thrusts under the noses of producers and directors. Nay, nay. These children mostly from theatrical families, have acting in their very blood. That's how they come to be so well disciplined on the lot.

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 4/25/1933, Pg 18



Todd Boyum originally shared this on Ancestry.com on 12/28/2014

The Rhinelander, Rhinelander, WI, 8/26/1936, Pg 4

The Republic, Columbus, IN, 7/27/1936, Pg 2

The Times Tribune, Scranton, PA, 7/27/1936, Pg 1

Oakland Tribune, Oakland, CA, 8/2/1936, Pg 36


The Los Angeles times, 2/23/1941, Pg 5


Former 'Times' Writer Selected as Most-Loved Among Hundreds of Hollywood's Movie Mothers
Wynonah Johnson Directs Work of Seven In Pictures
Not the mother of a star-child, but mother to seven substantial motion picture workers...
That is what has brought Wynonah Johnson a corsage of orchids, and the honor of the title "1941 Movie Mother."
It is not an empty honor either, for she was selected as the most loved of the myriad movie mothers-by the mothers themselves.
It happened a few days ago at the Motion-Picture Mother's party. There was a secret ballot, with Mrs. Johnson easy winner, although she was not present.
Ex-Times Writer
Mrs. Johnson is a small woman, weighing little more than 100 pounds. But she is busy. Her mother runs a newspaper in Louisiana, and Mrs. Johnson was a Times writer for 15 years. And now, between her telephone and her typewriter she barely finds time for the fun of living with the "gang".
Those Johnsons!
In the last 18 years they have appeared in dozens and hundreds of pictures-almost every one that had a child that was not a star.
It began when 5 year old Cammilla was needed for a Harry Carey western. Continued when a baby would not stop crying and production was held up.
"Our baby never cries," little Camilla told the irate director.
Real Baby Actor
So "our baby" was substituted. "Our baby" was 5-month-old Carmencita, to whom the confusion of the movie lot was exactly like the confusion at home.
"You don't happen to know where I can find a boy about 7, do you?" inquired the director a few days later, and so-Dick Winslow Johnson was in. Need for a 3-year-old brought out Seessel Anne.
Production on one picture was held up for a time, awaiting the arrival of the stork-and then 17-day-old Cullen became a movie babe. Young Payne, who is 10 now, became a motion-picture camera subject when he was 14 days old.
And the oldest boy, Kenneth, played in pictures from the time he was a small boy of 10. Sometimes one had a big part, and the others were a part of a gang. At other times all five, six or seven were in the same picture.
And always, there was Mother Johnson, sitting at the edge with her basket. In the basket there was darning, mending and such. And there were books, toys and various diversions to keep small tots quiet when they were not needed before the camera.
The money from the careers of the seven-went for music lessons, tonsillectomies, travel and education. Always when a child was cast in a role, there was a spot for the salary check.
Family's Home Life
Dick Winslow plays a dozen musical instruments and is at present in Miami, Fla., with his own orchestra.
The family resides at 333 S. Oxford Ave., a large white house where the seven and their friends live happy, responsible lives. Each youngster has learned to cook, and each has to take regular turn at buying, cooking and serving meals for the family. Budgeting is close, too, and a small given amount must suffice-even if there are guests.
"While they are learning, we had some strange meals," Mrs. Johnson said. "Once in a while a boy would serve three kinds of desert and little else. But mass psychology keeps them all in line. Remarks of the six others practically amount to public opinion."
Household Workers
All of the picture workers know how to sweep, scrub floors, make beds and sort books. And they all know how to tend babies, for when the seven were in a picture, and Mrs. Johnson had a 2-year-old and a baby in a basket, the older ones had to help.
And ias if her own were not enough, Mrs. Johnson reached out to mother other movie kids too. She was really interested in the careers of other children and her friendship with the other movie mothers has become a very precious thing to her.
She was surprised and touched to tears at the honor that came to her. Unaccustomed to the spotlight which she had always seen focused on her children and her friends, she tried to hide. She was afraid that someone would "glamorize" her-when she was only a mother, trying to be sensible in raising her brood.
Thought It Mistake
When the avalanche of telephone calls and letters started she was sure it must be a mistake. She was only Mother Johnson doing the things she had always done. Nothing wonderful in it. Of course, they had always had lots of fun, and she had made many lovely friends, but it could have happened to anyone else.
Lots of fun! Having Baby Cullen's head shorn of it's fat blond curls, so that he might have one funny curl for the series he played in so long. Having Carmencita miss her own birthday parties to play her part. Seeing her pretty youngsters in tatters, falling from cliffs, rescued from burning houses, kidnaped by treacherous villains, annoying lovers, learning studio-lot tricks that would never do for everyday living.
The Boy Reporter
and the years went along-year by year-until Kenneth was graduated with honors from the School of Architecture at S.C., receiving a gold medal for having been the outstanding student among the 1,700 graduates-during the entire five-year course. He became a designer of sets and continued in motion pictures for two years before breaking away to pursue his career. He is married and living Hot springs, Ark., is 6 ft. 4 in. tall-and an artist.
Dick Winslow was probably the most gifted child of the family. He was for five years the "boy reporter" of The Times radio broadcast in the old Uncle John days. He was in pictures always, and made himself a musician, playing the pipe organ, the marimba, vibraharp, accordion and many other instruments.
Girl Film Players
Camilla played in 48 comedies while she was a very small girl, receiving screen credits galore. Her pictures were all sorts-"So Big", Garden of Allah," "Sparrows-and lately "Brigham Young." Four of the Johnsons were in the last.
She attended Los Angeles High School, City College and expects to complete her work at U.C.L.A. in June.
Seessel Ann worked all the time when she was little-always on location, in the desert, at Catalina, in the mountains. yet she has finished high school and is attending City College for the third year, majoring in fine arts with photography as her hobby.
Film Garb On Dolls
Carmencita, who became an actress at 5 months, received 42 screen credits for good hits and parts while she was a tiny girl. She was graduated from high school in June and, anxious to blaze her own trail-away from the other accomplished Johnsons-she enrolled for work at Santa Monica Junior College. Carmencita has won medals for essays and her brother Kenneth, the artist, says that Carmencita has real talent for drawing.
Carmencita's wardrobe-her funny dresses that she wore in the movies-have all been copied in miniature, to be worn by dolls especially imported by Carrie jacobs Bond. She has dolls and dolls.
Cullen became famous as the bald-headed baby with the curl indorsing baby pants, crayons, foods and such. He is still doing pretty well, having played Ann Rutledge's brother in the last Lincoln picture. He is 14 and attending John Burroughs Junior High. He plans to be an aviator.
Payne has been in pictures for so long that he can imagine no other childhood. He plays in the school orchestra and he and Cullen sing in the boy's choir.
All have learned the philosophy of accepting things as they happen.
Mr. Johnson? Oh, yes, there is a husband and father. Sidney Johnson is a bald-headed businessman, office manager of the Los Angeles Times Federal Credit Union, who enjoys his family but leaves the movie careers to the seven and their mother.

Wynonah Breazeale Johnson died 2/4/1944 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA.

California, Death Index, 1940-1997
Name: Wynonah Breazeale Johnson
[Wynonah Breazeale Breazeale]
Gender: Female
Birth Date: 18 Dec 1889
Birth Place: Louisiana
Death Date: 4 Feb 1944
Death Place: Los Angeles
Mother's Maiden Name: Lachs
Father's Surname: Breazeale

FindAGrave.com
Wynonah B Breazeale Johnson
BIRTH 18 Dec 1889, Louisiana, USA
DEATH, 4 Feb 1944 (aged 54), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA
BURIAL Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA
PLOT Col. of Fidelity, Gardenia Terrace, Lot 0, Space 16222
MEMORIAL ID 85436251

The Times, Shreveport, LA, 2/7/1944, Pg 2
Natchitoches Native Dies
Mrs. Wynona B. Johnson Write, Succumbs In Hollywood
New Orleans, Feb. 6-Word was received here today of the death in Hollywood, Calif. Friday of Mrs. Wynonah Breazeale Johnson, well-known writer and a native of Natchitoches, La.
She was the daughter of the late Hopkins Payne Breazeale and Camilla Breazeale, who is editor and publisher of the Natchitoches Enterprise. Besides her mother and husband Mrs. Johnson is survived by three daughters and four sons.
Funeral services were held today in Los Angeles.


Sidney Kenneth Johnson, Sr. died 10/29/1960 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA.

California, Death Index, 1940-1997
Name: Sidney K Johnson
Social Security #: 563105731
Gender: Male
Birth Date: 8 Nov 1884
Birth Place: North Dakota
Death Date: 29 Oct 1960
Death Place: Los Angeles
Mother's Maiden Name: Borgum

Sidney K Johnson
BIRTH 8 Nov 1884, Mayville, Traill County, North Dakota, USA
DEATH 29 Oct 1960 (aged 75), Los Angeles County, California, USA
BURIAL Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA 
PLOT Col. of Fidelity, Gardenia Terrace, Lot 0, Space 16222
MEMORIAL ID 85436118




Let's see what happened to their seven children:

1) Sidney Kenneth Johnson, Jr. (DOB 11/14/1912 in Jefferson Davis Parish, LA; DOD 11/1/1974 in Los Angeles County, CA). Married Kathryn Hines (DOB 1/19/1915 in Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 7/25/1989 in Orange County, CA). They had 4 children. Sidney Kenneth Johnson, Jr. graduated from Belmont High School and Los Angeles City college. He graduated with honors from School of Architecture at University of Southern California. He became an architect, engineer and co-founder and chairman of the board of Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall in Santa Maria. It became an international architectural, engineering and planning firm.

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 2/7/1940, Pg 25

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 11/10/1974, Pg 100

Kathryn Hines Johnson died 7/25/1989 in Orange County, CA.

U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007
Name: Kathryn Hines
[Kathryn Hines Johnson]
[Kathryn Johnson]
Gender: Female
Race: White
Birth Date: 19 Jan 1915
Birth Place: Pasadena Los, California
Death Date: 25 Jul 1989
Father: Thomas C Hines
Mother: Lois Tubbs
SSN: 55109****
Notes: Nov 1936: Name listed as KATHRYN HINES; : Name listed as KATHRYN HINES JOHNSON; 08 Aug 1989: Name listed as KATHRYN H JOHNSON


3) Cammilla Breazeale Johnson (DOB 3/1/1918 in Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 8/4/1999 in North Hollywood, Los Angeles County, CA) married Edward St. Clair Jones (DOB 4/9/1908 in Wisconsin; DOD 10/26/1970 in Los Angeles County, CA). Cammilla Breazeale Johnson graduated from Los Angeles High School and Los Angeles City College. She married Edward St. Claire Jones and they had 3 children: Edward Carey Jones (1949-1982), Cammilla Wynonah Jones and Warren Craig Jones. Edward Clair Jones died 10/26/1970 in Los Angeles County, CA. She died 8/4/1999 in North Hollywood, Los Angeles County, CA. Cammilla Breazeale Johnson Jones died 8/4/1999.

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 8/15/1999, Pg 36



4) Seessel Anne Johnson (DOB 12/28/1920 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 1/13/1956 in Whittier, Los Angeles County, CA) married Custer Carleton Lang (DOB 11/10/1922 in Mandan, Morton County, NC; DOD 1/4/1996 in Los Angeles County, CA) on 7/23/1963 in Santa Barbara, CA.  They had John Carleton Lang, Dale Christopher Lang and Diana Lang. Seessel Ann graduated from Los Angeles High School and Los Angeles City College. After her death, Custer Carleton Lang married Beverly J. Klausman on 6/30/1957. He then married 3rd Aileen L. Pemberton on 7/23/1963 in Santa Barbara, CA and divorced her in 1978 in Orange County, CA.

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 10/3/1942, Pg 22

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 1/14/1956, Pg 6


5) Carmencita Breazeale Johnson (DOB 3/31/1923 in Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 9/26/2000 in ? ) married Jack Lucas Robertson (DOB Abt. 1922 in Fremon, Dodge County, NE; DOD 8/14/2003 in Ojai, Ventura County, Ca). They had Nicolas Robertson, Drew Robertson, Winslow Robertson, Cullen Robertson and Sydney Robertson. She was an artist.

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 9/29/2000, Pg 265



6) Cullen Bertram Johnson (DOB 8/30/1926 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; DOD 6/2/2009 in Portland, Multnomah County, OR). He was an actor, known for The First Round-Up (1934), Blood and Sand (1941) and The Power and the Glory (1933). He was in the U.S. Navy during World War II. married Joanne M. Crothers (DOB 6/10/1925 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA; DOD 2010 in WA) on 1/7/1947 in CA. I couldn't find an obituary for him.



7) Payne Breazeale Johnson (DOB 6/2/1930 in Los Angeles County, CA; DOD ? in ? ). He is an actor, known for Time Out for Lessons (1939), Cousin Wilbur (1939) and The Blue Bird (1940).
Payne Johnson married Alice Blakely Winn (DOB 11/16/1933 in San Diego Count, CA; DOD ? . They were married 7/30/1955 in San Diego County, Ca and divorced 4/16/1980. He married Patricia Gail Nylen on 12/21/1980 in San Diego, CA. I have not found a date of death or obituary.



2) Richard "Dick" Winslow Johnson (DOB 3/25/1915 in Jennings, Jefferson Davis Parish, LA; DOD 2/7/1991 of diabetes complications in North Hollywood, Los Angeles County, CA).

Played the piano on a champagne tour by plane from Los Angeles to Las Vegas featuring Dick Winslow on the Sky Piano. He made more than 650 flights. He sometimes had to lend money to people too broke to get their car out of airport parking on the way back.

A Hollywood child actor from 1927, Dick Winslow showed up in dozen of early talkies as page boys, messenger boys, and office boys. One of Winslow's few "named" roles was Joe Harper in the 1930 version of Tom Sawyer. Had appeared in 75 films by 1934. He played the pipe organ, piano, marimba, bag pipes, accordion, drums, saxophone and other wind instruments, Winslow graced many a film of the 1940s and 1950s, playing everything from picnic accordion players to cocktail pianists. “To Have and To Have Not” – 1944. Played in various nightclubs in Los Angeles in the late 1940’s and ‘50’s with a singer by the name of Carol Ann Beery, the daughter of Wallace Beery. The apotheosis of this stage of Winslow's career was his one-man band in Doris Day’s movie in 1965 - Do Not Disturb. A veteran of 60 years in the business, Dick Winslow made his last screen appearance as "the Old Man" in 1988's Fatal Judgment. Played as the one man band on an episode of the TV sitcom “Maude”.
Dick Winslow in King Creole in 1958

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 9/14/1924, Pg 30

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 7/10/1927, Pg 28

Ruth Chatterton and Dick Winslow in Sarah And Son (1930)

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 11/30/1930, Pg 38

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 12/9/1930, Pg 10

The San Bernardino County Sun, San Bernardino, CA, 11/13/1931, Pg 31


The Rhinelander Daily News, Rhinelander, WI, 8/26/1936, Pg 4


The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 7/8/1952, Pg 25

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 7/11/1952, Pg 23

Visalia Times Delta, Visalia, CA, 9/17/1953, Pg 2

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 4/15/1958, Pg 5

Nina Bara was born Frances Beatrice Baur on 5/3/1920 in Buenos Aires, Argentina to George Baur (American) and Carolyn Cunioli (Italian ballet dancer). She was an actress. She married 1st Robert Benjamin Sheldon an assistant television director, 2nd Richard "Dick" Winslow Johnson and 3rd Raymond Joseph Linke. Bara was an expert in dialects and worked on radio shows, then, in the 1940s at MGM and 20th Century Fox as a contract player acting in Westerns and dramas.

1944 The Mummy's Curse Young Cajun Woman in Cafe (uncredited)

1945 Pan-Americana Miss Argentina (uncredited)

1945 The Gay Senorita Lupita (uncredited)

1945 Yolanda and the Thief Chambermaid (uncredited)

1945 Adventure Girl (uncredited)

1946 Gilda Girl at Carnival (uncredited)

1946 The Thrill of Brazil Specialty Dancer (uncredited)

1946 Easy to Wed Rumba Dancer (uncredited)

1946 Of Human Bondage Model (uncredited)

1947 Black Hills Chiquita

1947 Training for Trouble (Short) Actress having dinner

1948 Three Daring Daughters Cuban Singer (uncredited)

1950 A Lady Without Passport Young Cuban Girl (uncredited)

1951 Hollywood Theatre Time (TV Series) - I Spy (1951)


1951-1955 Space Patrol (TV Series) Tonga- The Atomic Vault (1955) ... Tonga- Marooned on Procyon Four (1955) ... Tonga- Collapse of the Spider's Web (1955) ... Tonga- The Web of Arachna (1955) ... Tonga- Lair of the Space Spider (1955) ... Tonga138 episodes



1958 Missile to the Moon Alpha

1961 General Electric Theater (TV Series) Maria- The Iron Silence (1961) ... Maria

In the early 1960s, Bara made the dean's honor list at Los Angeles City College, where she majored in psychology. She earned a master's degree in library science at USC. She earned a master's degree in library science at USC and then established a corporate library at Blue Cross of Southern California. After retiring there in 1985 she worked as a substitute in the city library system. She passed away of cancer on 8/15/1990 in Glendale, Los Angeles County, CA.


Dick Winslow as Reporter Andy in 'Perry Mason' Season 1 (1957), The Case of The Sulky Girl

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 5/10/1960, Pg 49

Although he was primarily a pianist, Dick, like Hoagy Carmichael, was a multi-instrumentalist, and could play the marimba, the bag pipes, the saxophone and many other noise-making devices. In his later years, although he was still playing the piano in Hollywood restaurants and appearing in bit-parts on television, he decided to capitalize on his multi-instrumentalism. A small aside in an article from 1977 notes that Dick, at the age of 62, "delights in carrying 65 pounds on his back as a one-man band and making up lyrics for each charity event where he plays.”

Appeared in films like The Virginian (1929), Tom Sawyer (1930) as Joe Harper, Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) as Tinkler, The Blue Dahlia (1946), The Atomic Kid (1954), The Benny Goodman Story (1956) as Gil Rodin, Gypsy (1962), Bye Bye Birdie (1963), Frankie and Johnny (1966) with Elvis Presley, Funny Girl (1968), Airport (1970) as Mr. Schultz, The Apple Dumpling Gang (1975), The Other Side of the Mountain (1975), The Shootist (1976) as the Streetcar Driver that drives John Wayne's character to the bar for the final shoot-out, and Freaky Friday (1976).

Dick Winslow in The Wild, Wild West in 1965

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 11/13/1973, Pg 65

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 2/10/1987, Pg 24

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 2/14/1991, Pg 627

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, CA, 2/9/1991, Pg 536

Dick Winslow in Airport in 1970

Quote from his high school yearbook.

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