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Wednesday, May 29, 2019

James B. McIntosh

James B. McIntosh was married to Myrtle Irene McGee, the daughter of Eliza Jane Cassada and James Linville McIntosh. The Cassada line is in my Conner line. So he is not a blood relation, his wife was my 2nd cousin 3 times removed. It goes like this:

William Cassada and Jane Harrison had Rachel Pauline Cassada and Nathaniel VanBuren Cassada (brother and sister). My direct line would come through Rachel Pauline Cassada who married Samuel Bruce Ensley. Myrtle Irene McGee was descended from Nathaniel Van Buren Cassada and Ailsey Mahala Brown. They had Eliza Jane Cassada.

Nathaniel Van Buren Cassada was born 6/24/1838 in Buncombe County, NC to William Cassada and Jane Harrison and died 9/30/1868 in Buncombe County, NC. He married Ailsey Mahala Brown (DOB 8/1/1841 in Buncombe County, NC; DOD 9/29/1927 in Leicester, Buncombe County, NC). They had Laura Kate Cassada, Eliza Jane Cassada, William Van Cassada, Anna Vianna Cassada and Sarah V. Cassada.

Eliza Jane Cassada was born 6/30/1864 in Buncombe County, NC and died 3/22/1932 in Buncombe County, NC. She married James Linville McGee (DOB 3/20/1860 in NC; DOD 12/18/1939 in Buncombe County, NC). They had Grady McGee, Myrtle Irene McGee, Van Ward McGhee, Denver Wilson McGee, Annie May McGee, William Dewey McGee, James Conrad McGee.

Asheville, NC in Spring 1916

Myrtle Irene McGee was born 6/28/1892 in Buncombe County, NC; DOD 3/18/1982 in Asheville, Buncombe County, NC). She married James Bennie McIntosh (DOB 8/23/1891 in Madison County, NC; DOD 11/17/1968 in Oteen, Buncombe County, NC). They had:

1) Hurley Myrtle McIntosh (DOB 6/5/1920 in Asheville, Buncombe County, NC; DOD 7/1984 in Asheville, Buncombe County, NC) married Charles Nelson Baumann (DOB 3/30/1904 in TN; DOD 1/24/1986 in Asheville, Buncombe County, NC). They had a son with a story, James Nelson Baumann. James Nelson Baumann was born 10/11/1945 in Buncombe County, NC. I found marriage license announcements in the newspaper in 1968 to Carol Ann Gillis (DOB Abt. 1946) and in 1971 to Gay Marlia Turner (DOB Abt. 1937). James Nelson Baumann was killed by Michael Allen Hoyle at Buzzard Rock off Elk Mountain Scenic Hwy. The newspaper reports that it was sort of a duel. The two men got into an argument at an Asheville Bar and agreed to meet to "settle it". Hoyle was given 20 years for voluntary manslaughter.

Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 1/31/1976, Pg 16
James N. Baumann
James Nelson Baumann, 30, of 16 Oak Park Road, died Friday in an Asheville hospital from gunshot wounds.
Born in Buncombe County, he was a 1965 graduate of Lee Edwards High School and a member of the First Baptist Church. He lived in Hendersonville during 1975 and was a land surveyor.
Surviving are a son, James T. Baumann of Asheville, the parents, Charles and Hurley McIntosh Baumann of Asheville; three brothers, David Baumann of Asheville, Charles S. Baumann of Fairfax, Va. and Robert C. Baumann of Seabrook, Md.; three sisters, Miss Su Baumann of Montpellier, France, Mrs. Carol Lewis of Greensboro and Mrs. Jeanne Gilmore of Asheville; and the maternal Grandmother, Mrs. J.B. McIntosh of Asheville.
Services will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday in the Asheville Chapel of Penland and Sons Funeral Home. The Rev. George Patterson will officiate. Burial will be in Lewis Memorial Park...

NC Death Certificate #374, Registration District #011.95, James Nelson Baumann, DOD 1/30/1976 in "DOA Memorial Mission Hospital, Asheville, Buncombe county, NC"
Male, White, Divorced, DOB 10/11/1945 in NC, 30 yrs old
Occupation: Land surveyor, self employed
Father: Charles Baumann, Mother: Hurley McIntosh, Informant: Charles Baumann, 16 Oak Park Rd, Asheville, NC
DOD 1/30/1976 at 3:30am
Cause of death: Massive brain destruction due to gunshot wound to head
Autopsy? Yes
Homicide, a shoot out with another man Elk Mountain Scenic Hwy, Asheville, NC
Buried: 2/1/1976 in Lewis Memorial Park, Asheville, NC

Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 1/31/1976, Pg 11
Murder Charge Filed In Wake Of Shooting
James Nelson Baumann, 30, of 16 Oak Park Road was shot to death early Friday at Buzzard Rock off Elk Mountain Scenic Highway, the Buncombe County Sheriff's Department reported.
According to Chief Investigator Donald R. Whitaker, the shooting occurred around 2:20 a.m. in the aftermath of an argument which began earlier at an Asheville bar. Baumann was arguing with Michael Allen Hoyle, 25, of 10 Deva Glenn Road, and the two men agreed to drive up to Buzzard Rock and "settle it," Whitaker said.
He said Baumann was first to arrive at the agreed upon spot and fired one shot at Hoyle with a 410 shotgun while Hoyle was still in his car. Baumann's shot missed. Whitaker said, and Hoyle then fired three shots with a .38-caliber revolver. All three shots struck Baumann, who was dead at the scene, Whitaker said.
Whitaker said Hoyle drove back toward town and called the sheriff's department and told them what had happened, then returned to the scene to meet the deputies. The shooting was also reported at approximately the same time by witnesses who stopped an Asheville Police Department patrolman on Merrimon Avenue, Whitaker said.
He said two witnesses were questioned Friday morning, and the investigation is continuing.
Whitaker said Hoyle has been charged with first degree murder and is being held in Buncombe County Jail. No bond had been set as of Friday afternoon.


Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 2/4/1976, Pg 21
Defender Appointed In Slaying Charge
Michael Allen Hoyle, charge with first degree murder in the Friday shooting death of James Nelson Baumann, remained in the Buncombe County jail without bond Tuesday after a public defender was appointed for him
A hearing in Buncombe County District Court is set for Feb. 13.
Meanwhile, said Donald R. Whitaker, chief investigator of the county Sheriff's Department, witnesses to the argument that erupted between Hoyle and Baumann at a local bar are being interviewed.
"I think there are only two people involved, the victim and the accused," Whitaker said Tuesday.
According to Whitaker's account following the incident at 2:20 a.m. last Friday, the two men decided to drive to Buzzard Rock on Elk Mountain Scenic Highway and settle the argument that had begun in the bar.
Whitaker said that Hoyle told him Baumann, 30, of 16 Oak Park Road was first to arrive at the scene and the first to shoot. Hoyle then fired three shots, two of which, Whitaker said, could have been fatal by themselves.
Hoyle then drove toward Asheville, called the sheriff's Department, and met deputies at the scene.
Hoyle, 25, of 10 Deva Glenn Road, had a .38 caliber pistol. Baumann had a 410 shotgun-.22 caliber rifle over-and-under combination. Whitaker said that the .22 charge was still in the chamber when the gun was found.


Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 3/5/1976, Pg 17
Duelling Charge Dropped, But Duelist Is Jailed
A 20-year sentence, the maximum for voluntary manslaughter, was ordered Thursday for Michael Allen Hoyle, 25, of Deva Glen Road by Buncombe Superior Court Judge Harry C. Martin.
Hoyle had been indicted on the extremely rare charge of fighting a duel, in consequence of a challenge sent and received, in which James Nelson Baumann, 30, of Oak Park Road was killed and Hoyle survived.
The state dismissed the dwelling charge after Hoyle pleaded guilty to the manslaughter count.
The shooting occurred around 2:20 a.m. Jan. 30 at Buzzard Rock off Elk Mountain Scenic Highway, sheriff's deputies said. The two men had argued earlier at an Asheville bar.
Baumann was allegedly armed with a 410 shotgun, and Hoyle with a .38-caliber revolver.
A District Court judge said when the duelling law was passed in North Carolina in the 1870s, with the threat of life imprisonment for seconds as well as participators, duelling except over state lines virtually ceased.
Judge Martin examined some case books and said the only dueling charge appealed to the N.C. Supreme Court took place in 1902. In this verdict was overturned because the duel challengers had fought with their fists under common law, Judge Martin said, this offense was "affray", with a maximum 30-day sentence.
Judge Martin said the wording of the statute on duelling was vague, and had never been tested by the Supreme Court. So there is no way to say whether life imprisonment is mandatory or maximum punishment, or whether self-defense could be pleaded by a survivor, Judge Martin said.


Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 5/15/1989, Pg 13

I believe Michael Allen Hoyle died on 2/7/2016 in Asheville, Buncombe County, NC and is buried in the same cemetery as James Nelson Baumann.


Buzzard Rock, Elk Mountain Scenic Hwy

 View from Buzzard Rock







2) James Florio McIntosh (DOB 7/17/1922 in Buncombe County, NC; DOD 8/16/2012 in  Greenville, TX) married Lois Lorilla Wallace (DOB 8/8/1914; DOD 3/2 2008 in Carrollton, Denton County, TX).

3) Madeline Gayle McIntosh (DOB 8/14/1927 in Buncombe County, NC; DOD 10/16/2018 in Greer, Greenville County, SC) married Clyde Edward Kincaid (DOB 3/25/1929 in Lenoir, Caldwell County, NC; DOD 1/14/1981 in Hickory, Catawba County, NC)

4) John L. McIntosh (DOB Abt. 1931 in Buncombe County, NC)


Let's look more closely at James Bennie McIntosh (aka "Big Mac"). He was a very interesting man to read about in newspaper accounts.

James B. McIntosh was born 8/23/1891 in Paint Fork, Madison County, NC to John Wesley McIntosh and Jane Anderson.



1900 U.S. Census of Middle Fork of Ivy, Madison County, North Carolina; Page: 4; Enumeration District: 0076; FHL microfilm: 1241205, "John McIntosh"
John McIntosh, Head, W(hite), M(ale), Born Apr, 1861, 39 yrs old, Married 17 yrs, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer, Can read and write, Owns farm free of mortgage
Jane McIntosh, Wife, W, F, Born Dec, 1865, 35 yrs old, Married 17 yrs, 4 children with 3 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Bud McIntosh, Son, W, M, Born Aug, 1891, 8 yrs old, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Eller McIntosh, Daughter, W, F, Born July 1886, 13 yrs old, Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Trissie McIntosh, Daughter, W, F, Born June, 1898, 1 yrs old, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC

Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 8/18/1916, Pg 3
Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 9/19/1917, Pg 8

Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 11/3/1917, Pg 10

U.S. WWI Draft Registration Cards, Registration State: North Carolina; Registration County: Buncombe; Roll: 1765622; Draft Board: 2, Fold 1 1175, No. 163
James Bennie McIntosh, 25
56 Penland, Asheville, (Buncombe County), NC
DOB 8/23/1891 in Paint Fork, NC
Occupation: Police officer for City of Asheville
Single
32-1-7-A
Tall, Stout, Blue eyes, Black hair
Disabled? No, but has rheumatism contracted in flood of July 1916
Signed by him 6/5/1917 in Asheville, NC
 The Flood of 1916 Western North Carolina was devastated.






Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 10/25/1959, Pg 13




North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011
Name: James B McIntosh
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 26
Birth Year: abt 1892
Marriage Date: 25 May 1918
Marriage Place: Henderson, North Carolina, USA
Spouse: Myrtle Irene McGee
Spouse Gender: Female
Spouse Race: White
Spouse Age: 25
Event Type: Marriage
Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 7/8/1918, Pg 3

 Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 7/24/1919, Pg 6

1920 U.S. Census of Asheville Ward 2, Buncombe County, North Carolina; Roll: T625_1286; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 9, "J.B. McIntosh"
J.B. McIntosh, Head, M(ale), W(hite), 28 yrs old, Married, Can read and write, Born in NC, both parents born in NC, Policeman City
Myrtle McIntosh, Wife, F, W, 37 yrs old, Married, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Dewey McGee, Lodger (Myrtle's brother), M, W, 18 yrs old, Single, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Salesman typewriter
J.C. Magie, Lodger, M, W, 70 yrs old, Widowed, Born in Scotland, Both parents born in Scotland, Retired

1930 U.S. Census of Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina; Page: 17B; Enumeration District: 0006; FHL microfilm: 2341409, "James B. McIntosh"
James B. McIntosh, Lodger, M(ale), W(hite), 38 yrs old, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Real Estate Agent
Myrtle McIntosh, Lodger, F, W, 37 yrs old, Married, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC

1940 U.S. Census of Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina; Roll: m-t0627-02877; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 11-10A, "James McIntosh"
James McIntosh, Head, M(ale), W(hite), 48 yrs old, Married, Attended school thru 8th grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935, Salesman retail auto
Myrtle McIntosh, Wife, F, W, 47 yrs old, Married, Attended college 2 yrs, Born in NC
Hurley McIntosh, Daughter, F, W, 19 yrs old, Single, Attended college 2 yrs, Born in NC
James McIintosh, Jr., Son, M, W, 17 yrs old, Single, Attended high school 4 yrs, Born in NC
Gayle McIntosh, Daughter, 13 yrs old, Single, Attending school, Born in NC
John McIntosh, Son, M, W, 8 yrs old, Single, Attending school, Born in NC

Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 12/27/1953, pg 39
Big Mack Took A Back Seat To No One In Days When Wrestling Was For Men
By Karl Fleming, Citizen Times Sports Writer
Show Above Is James B. McIntosh of 25 Orchard Street, Asheville, a former topflight wrestler. Left photo shows McIntosh as he appeared when he was wrestling in the Army during World War 1. Right photo is him as he is today, 62 years old and healthy and happy
In the lusty, happy rolicking Twenties when professional wrestlers were tough as nails and happy to prove it, Big Mack McIntosh of Asheville could whip his weight (220 pounds) in wildcats.
Big Mack was a wrestling man.
He came down out of the hills of Paint Fork with fuzz on his chin and joined the Army and when he wasn't shooting at Germans from the trenches of France he passed the time of day by pinning strong men to a piece of canvas in a wrestling ring until they cried "Uncle."
Now this was in the sad-departed era when wrestlers were wrestlers in the true sense of the word.
All the actors were performing on the legitimate stage then. Nowadays, all the thespians who can't get a job in Hollywood put on lace trunks, frazzle their hair and perfume it up real good and call themselves wrestlers. With tongue in cheek.
Most of them couldn't beat their way out of a wet paper sack.
But that wasn't the situation happily, when Big Mack was wrestling. You had to be a man and you had to be smart and the fans didn't care whether you could scowl real mean and cry or not. All they wanted you to do was wrestle.
That appealed to Big Mack. That and a rather quirkish incident, is what got him interested in wrestling in the first place.
He finished school at Mars Hill "common school" as it was known in those days, and moved to Asheville when he was 16. He got a job with the Old Asheville Street Railway and around 1916 found out that a big bruiser of a man named Farmer Burns was training for the World's Championship-wrestling.
Burns and his trainer, Frank Gotch, had set up headquarters at the old YMCA and big Mack used to go down there every afternoon after work and watch proceedings.
He hung around so much, and seemed such an affable young man, that Gotch got to liking him and it wasn't long before Big Mack was conscripted as Burn's guinea pig.
Big Mack suffered in this period. But he learned-the hard way. Burns would get him down on the mat and twist him up like a pretzel and afterwards when Big Mack lurched home in the dark he felt like a piece of meat two dogs had been fighting over.
But he loved it.
In 1917, Big Mack heard the guns roaring and saw the boys marching proudly off to war so he up and got in the Army. Pretty son he was shipped off to France.
He was in the 321st Infantry "Wildcats" and a wildcat he was.
After awhile the shooting stopped and the Germans loped off down the road, thoroughly whipped-for awhile.
The Army was seeking entertainment for the troops and called on Big Mack to tour Europe to meet wrestling champions of other divisions.
He fought, and beat, 34 of them and never lost but one match. And all this without the aid of a trainer or medical advisor. In those days you could get hurt wrestling.
Big Mack wrestled in the principal cities of England, France, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Spain. One night in Monte Carlo 7,000 people saw him wrestle and the gambling people at the casinos suffered more than somewhat.
Then Big Mack came home.
And when he got here a big tough railroad man named Bearcat Parker was training too, for the World's Championship.
Well, everybody knew Big Mack was a wrestling man.
So it wasn't long before the talk started. Why not a match between McIntosh and Parker? Why not indeed?
Parker was willing. Big Mack was willing. And the plans were made, a match of the best-two-of-three falls with winner take all.
The men started training and you would have thought Dempsey and Tunney were going to fight in Asheville. Excitement-and betting-mounted.
The day of the grapple you couldn't have gotten within 100 yards of the old City Auditorium where the battle was to take place. The papers had played it up big and, actually, it was at that time the biggest sports event ever to be held in the city.
Then came the match. Down into the tense, smoke-filled arena came the combatants. There was Big Mack, 220 pounds of muscle and smart. And there was Parker, built as sleek as a tiger and just about as fast. He weighed 190.
They got in the ring and surveyed each other and started a monumental battle of strength, stamina and cunning.
Big Mack won the first fall but it took him 28 minutes to do it and both the men were dead tired after the half-hour struggle. But the tremendous strain had worn on Parker and Big Mack lumbered out and took the second fall-and the match-in three minutes. That was his last big match.
He had married young and the kids were coming. He has four grown children now.
Since he quit wrestling, Big Mack has been in the real estate business, has been chief guard at Oteen and has held several law enforcement jobs.
But wrestling was his first love.
He doesn't love it any more, or doesn't care for the stuff promoters laughingly refer to as wrestling these days.
"I went to a couple of matches recently", Big Mack said.
"But it does something to a straight shooter to watch this stuff they call wrestling today. It's pretty good exhibition but it's all fake."
"What they do isn't wrestling", he said.
Today, at 62, Big Mack is healthy and robust and his handshake is firm and he has a zest for living.
"I hunt and fish a lot with my friends," he said.
"A man has to do something active. It's the only way to stay alive."

NC Death Certificate #36728, Registration District #11.00, James B. McIntosh, DOD 11/17/1968 in V.A. Hospital, Oteen, Buncombe County, NC
Usual residence: 25 Orchard St, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC
Male, White, Married to Myrtle McGee, DOB 8/23/1891 in NC, 77 yrs old
Father: John W. McIntosh - dec., Mother: Jane Anderson - dec., Informant: Hospital records of V.A. Hospital, Oteen, NC
DOD 11/17/1968 at 10:40am
Cause of death: Coronary insufficiency due to arteriosclerosis
Other condition was lipid pneumonia
Buried: 11/19/1968 in Lewis Memorial Park, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 11/18/1968, Pg 5
J.B. McIntosh, Former Fireman, Policeman, Dies
Former Asheville policeman James B. McIntosh of 25 Orchard St. died Sunday afternoon in a local hospital after a long illness. He was 77.
McIntosh's varied professional career included service as a city fireman and a number of years as a professional wrestler.
Known as "Big Mac" to many friends, McIntosh was honored in 1959 for serving 50 years as a member of the First Baptist Church choir.
McIntosh joined the choir in 1910 and held the record for the longest period of choir membership in the church. He was also a long-time member of the church's quartet.
He was a veteran of World War I and served with the infantry in France, where he once served as top sergeant for a company of Cherokee Indians.
McIntosh was a personal friends of author Thomas Wolfe and worked out on wrestling mats with the novelist a number of times while Wolfe was a student at the University of North Carolina.
He was a member of the American Legion and Mt. Herman Masonic Lodge No. 118.
Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Myrtle McGee McIntosh; two sons, Lt. Co. James McIntosh of Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., and John McIntosh of Washington, D.C.; two daughters, Mrs. Hurley Baumann and Mrs. Clyde Kincaid of Asheville; and a sister, Miss Mae McIntosh of Marshall.
Services will be held Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the First Baptist Church.
Dr. Cecil Sherman and the Rev. Henry Finch will officiate. Burial will be in Lewis Memorial Park. Masons of Mt. Herman Lodge will be pallbearers.
The family will receive friends at Berryman-Hall funeral home from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday.


Asheville Citizen Times, Asheville, NC, 3/20/1982, Pg 11
Myrtle McIntosh
Myrtle McGee McIntosh, 89, formerly of 25 Orchard St., Asheville, died Thursday in an Asheville hospital.
A native of Buncombe County, she was the daughter of the late James Linville and Eliza Cassada McGee and the wife of the late James B. "Big Mac" McIntosh, who died in 1968. She was a retired schoolteacher and a member and Sunday School teacher of the First Baptist Church.
Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. C.N. Baumann of Asheville and Gayle Kincaid of Hickory; two sons, James F. McIntosh of Dallas, Texas, and John L. McIntosh of Washington, D.C.; and six grandchildren.
Services will be held at 2:30 p.m. Sunday in the Asheville chapel of Penland and Sons Funeral Home. The Rev. George Patterson will officiate. Burial will be in Lewis Memorial Park.
the family will receive friends from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday at the funeral home...

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