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Sunday, April 19, 2015

Oscar Alexander Huneycutt and Vivial Mae Barnes Huneycutt

Oscar Alexander Huneycutt is my paternal Grandfather. Oscar was the eldest born to William Eli Huneycutt (DOB 7/25/1876 in Stanly County, NC to Ambrose Ervin Huneycutt and Jane Elizabeth Hinson; DOD 12/20/1948 in Stanly County, NC) and Eva Malinda Boon (DOB 3/15/1873 in Stanly County, NC to William Peter Boon and Mary Jane Smith: DOD 2/19/1939 in Norwood, Stanly County, NC). William Eli Huneycutt and Eva Malinda Boon were married 3/2/1898 in Wharf, Ansonville township, Anson County, NC.


William Eli Huneycutt



Eva Malinda Boon Huneycutt

Oscar Huneycutt was born a little over 9 months later on 12/26/1898 in Ansonville County, NC. One of those honeymoon babies!

1900 U.S. Census of Center,  Stanly County,  North Carolina; Roll:  T623_ 1218; Page:  8A; Enumeration District:  124, Lines 38-45, "Alexander Honeycutt" and "Will Honeycutt"
Alexander Honeycutt, Head, W(hite), M(ale), Born Aug, 1869, 30 yrs old, Married 9 yrs, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer, Rents farm
Nannie Honeycutt, Wife, W, F, Born April, 1873, 27 yrs old, Married 9 yrs, 4 children with 3 still living, Born NC, Both parents born in NC
Marry J. Honeycutt (sic), Daughter, W, F, Born July, 1892, 8 yrs old, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Carl R. Honeycutt, Son, W, M, Born May, 1896, 4 yrs old, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC,
Robbert E. Honeycutt (sic), W, M, Born Nov, 1898, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
William Honeycutt, Head, W(hite), M(ale), Born July, 1876, Married 2 yrs, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer, Rents farm
Malinda Honeycutt, Wife, W, F, Born (blank), 24 yrs old (DOB 1876), Married 2 yrs, 1 child with 1 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Oscar A. Honeycutt, Son, W, M, Born Dec, 1898, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC



1910 U.S. Census of Winfield Rd., Tyson,  Stanly,  North Carolina; Roll:  T624_1125; Page:  4A; Enumeration District:  0125; Image:  531; FHL Number:  1375138, Lines 12-18, "Hunley Cuntwill E." (sic, because of the way the census taker wrote Huney_cutt with a space between the first and second syllables and his messy handwriting)
Cuntwill E. Hunley, Head, M(ale), W(hite), 33 yrs old (DOB 1876), First marriage, Married 12 yrs (DOM 1898), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer of home farm
Lendy Hunley (sic, should be Malinda), Wife, F, W, 33 yrs old (DOB 1876), First marriage, Married 12 yrs, 6 children with 5 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Laborer on home farm
Oscar A. Hunley, Son, M, W, 11 yrs old (DOB 1899), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Laborer on home farm
Allie Hunley, Daughter, F, W, 6 yrs old (DOB 1904), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Dellie Hunley (sic, should be Dallie), Daughter, F, W, 6 yrs old (DOB 1904), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Grover Hunley, Son, M, W, 4 yrs old (DOB 1906), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Emmia Hunley (sic, should be Vernia), Daughter, F, W, 1 yrs 7/12 mos old (DOB 1908), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Bud and Bessy Floyd
Felt J. and Fannie Linger
Harry and Mary Crump
Crett Mary E. Hurrey (sic, should be Mary E. Huneycutt), Head, F, W, 38 yrs old (DOB 1872), Married 19 yrs now Widowed, 10 children with 9 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer on home farm (widow of Alvie S. Huneycutt, brother of William Eli Huneycutt)
Nance Hurrey (sic, should be Vance Huneycutt), Son, M, W, 18 yrs old (DOB 1892), Son, M, W, Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Laborer on home farm
Minnie Hurrey, Daughter, F, W, 17 yrs old (DOB 1893), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
I. Loe Hurrey (sic, should be Iler Pearl Huneycutt), Daughter, F, W, 15 yrs old (DOB 1895), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Olla Hurrey (sic), Daughter, F, W, 14 yrs old (DOB 1896), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Marshall Hurrey, Son, M, W, 11 yrs old (DOB 1899), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Jenenia Hurrey (sic), Daughter, F, W, 7 yrs old (DOB 1903), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Johnnie Hurrey, Son, M, W, 6 yrs old (DOB 1904), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Leaured Hurrey, Son, M, W, 4 yrs old (DOB 1906), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Launce A. Hunycutt (sic, should be Lawrence A. Huneycutt), Head, M, W, 20 yrs old (DOB 1890), First marriage, Married 1 yr, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer of home farm (Son of Alvie S Huneycutt and Mary Ellen Stafford Huneycutt)
Margarret Hunycutt (sic), Wife, F, W, 22 yrs old (DOB 1888), First marriage, Married 1 yr, 1 child with 1 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Lucy Hunycutt, Daughter, F, W, 7/12 mos old (1909), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC




William Eli Huneycutt and Eva Malinda Boon Huneycutt had 6 children:
1) Oscar Huneycutt
2) Clara May Huneycutt (DOB 12/27/1900 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 11/30/1901 in Stanly County, NC; Buried Cottonville Baptist Church, 4888 Plank Road, Cottonville, Norwood, Stanly County, NC)
3) Twins Allie Honeycutt (DOB 8/11/1903 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 11/19/2006 in Norwood, Stanly County, NC; Buried Cottonville Baptist Church, 4888 Plank Road, Cottonville, Norwood, Stanly County, NC) married James Henry Hinson, Jr. (DOB 3/12/1900 in Albemarle, Stanly County, NC; DOD 11/10/1989 in Norwood, Stanly County, NC). They had William Thomas "W.T." Hinson, Mildred Estelle Hinson Gradillas, Hazel Maxine Hinson Fisher, James Everett Hinson, Myra Truette Hinson.
4) Twins Dallie Honeycutt (DOB 8/11/1903 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 3/8/1954 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, NC;Buried at Sharon Memorial Park Cemetery, 5716 Monroe Road, Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, NC) married Roy Frank McIntyre (DOB 5/21/1902 in NC; DOD 5/17/1982 in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County, NC). They had Roy Curtis McIntyre, Robert Lee McIntyre, Shirley Ann McIntyre Presson.
5) Grover Cleveland Honeycutt (DOB 12/3/1905 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 9/26/1950 in Cabarrus County, NC; Buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Church Street North, Concord, Cabarrus County, NC) married Agatha "Gatha" Sides (DOB 7/4/1910 in Concord, Cabarrus County, NC; DOD 3/28/1991 in Dallas, TX. They had Richard Leon Honeycutt, William "Bill" Lee Honeycutt, Martha Joan Honeycutt Jackson, Jewel Young Honeycutt Thompson Cassilas, Evelyn Honeycutt Ward Spears, Jean Carolyn Honeycutt Overcash.
6. Vernia "Vernie" Mae Huneycutt (DOB 9/12/1908 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 9/7/1990 in Albemarle, Stanly County, NC; Buried Cottonville Baptist Church, 4888 Plank Road, Cottonville, Norwood, Stanly County, NC)


Photo taken from Hunnicutt-Honeycutt-Huneycutt, Virginia to NC, Descendents of George Honeycutt, Sr. of Stanly County, NC by William "Bill" Lee Honeycutt



Will Eli Huneycutt



Eva Malinda Boon Huneycutt

1920 U.S. Census of Tyson,  Stanly County, North Carolina; Roll: T625_1323; Page:  10A; Enumeration District: 150; Image: 570, Lines 15-30, "Will Honeycutt" (sic) and "Gunny Honeycutt" (sic, should be Gum Huneycutt or Zechariah Montgomery Huneycutt)
Will Honeycutt, Head, Rents farm, M(ale), W(hite), 43 yrs old (DOB 1877), Married, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Malinda Honeycutt, Wife, F, W, 45 yrs old, (DOB 1875), Married, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Oscar Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 21 yrs old (DOB 1899), Single, Attended school, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Allie Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 16 yrs old (DOB 1904), Single, Attended school, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Dallie Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 16 yrs old (DOB 1904), Single, Attended school, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Grover Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 14 yrs old (DOB 1906), Single, Attended school, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Vernia Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 11 yrs old (DOB 1909), Single, Attended school, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Gunny Honeycutt (sic), Head, Rents farm, M(ale), W(hite), 40 yrs old (DOB 1880), Married, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer (Will Huneycutt's brother)
Maggie Honeycutt, Wife, F, W, 35 yrs old (DOB 1885), Married, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Valteor Honeycutt (sic, should be Valda Huneycutt), Daughter, F, W, 16 yrs old (DOB 1904), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Surgeon Honeycutt (sic, should be Spurgeon Huneycutt), Son, M, W, 15 yrs old (DOB 1905), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Wilard Honeycutt (sic, should be Millard Huneycutt), Son, M, W, 12 yrs old (DOB 1908), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer
Cora Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 9 yrs old (DOB 1911), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Eddie Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 7 yrs old (DOB 1913), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Clyde Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 3 yrs 7/12 mos old (DOB 1917), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Paul Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 1 yrs 6/12 mos old (DOB 1918), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC



Oscar attended Davis School through 8th grade.

Davis School (photograph from Stanly County, NC Museum Facebook page)


Oscar Alexander Huneycutt

Then he attended Palmerville Academy near Badin, NC where he met a lifelong friend named Harloe Omry "H.O." Hicks, Sr. (DOB 2/29/1892 in NC to Joseph Richard Hicks and Allene Williams Eddins; DOD 11/14/1967 in Albemarle Hospital, Albemarle, Stanly County, NC of myocardial infarction and Diabetes at the age of 75 yrs old). He lived on Palmerville Rd, New London, Stanly County, NC. He was married to Charlotte Lenoir Greenlee (DOB 12/12/1898 in NC to Ephraim Leonard or Leland Greenlee and Kate May Dover; DOD 4/3/1975 in New London, Stanly County, NC at home of a possible stroke) at the age of 76 yrs old). Harloe was a big man and he had 4 sons: Harloe Omry Hicks, Jr. (DOB 1927), Joseph "Joe" Greenlee Hicks (DOB 1925), Carl Bain Hicks (DOB 8/8/1934 ; DOD 2/5/2001) and James "Jim" or "Jimmy" Richard Hicks (DOB 1936). The boys worked at Carolina Aluminum Co (later Alcoa). Harloe was a guard at Carolina Aluminum Co. Carl wound up with his father's place. It was a nice house and is still kept up and looks good.


Papa got the Spanish Flu during the Flu Pandemic in 1918. He would have been 20 yrs old. He said he was unconscious for several days. But he survived. He didn't get to graduate, he had to go back home to help his father on the farm which is reflected in his US WWI Draft Registration card.

I found no further records of any military service, just his draft registration.



If this picture is of Papa and his grandfather, it was taken before Ambrose Ervin Huneycutt died in 1914 (Papa would have been 16 yrs old in 1914). Papa's Grandfather Ambrose Ervin Huneycutt was in the War of Northern Aggression.

He eventually moved to Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, NC to work for awhile at a wagon company and then at a furniture making company. Grandma had gotten a job at R.J. Reynolds and they were boarding at different boarding houses but close enough that they met. Oscar married Vivian Mae Barnes on 9/2/1922 in Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, NC.



Vivian Mae Barnes was born 3/4/1904 in Churchland, Davidson County, NC to Avery Lawrence Barnes (DOB 7/9/1877 in Davidson County, NC to Lewis Frances Barnes and Anna Elizabeth "Betty" Brawley; DOD 11/11/1907 in Davidson County, NC; Buried Barnes Cemetery, Next To Churchland Baptist Church, Hwy 150, Davidson County, NC) and Addie Mae Michael (DOB 4/28/1878 in Davidson County, NC to William Rankin Michael and Pernina Jane Hedrick; DOD 9/11/1963 in Tyro, Davidson County, NC). Avery Lawrence Barnes and Addie Mae Michael were married 1/28/1900 in Davidson County, NC. Vivian's paternal great grandfather, John Pinckney Barnes and her maternal grandfather, William Rankin Michael, served in the War of Northern Aggression.

1900 U.S. Census of Boone, Davidson County, North Carolina; Roll: T623_ 1192; Page: 12B; Enumeration District: 28, Lines 75-77, "Avery F. Baines" (sic)
Avery F. Baines, Head, W(hite), M(ale), Born July, 1877, 22 yrs old, Married 0 yrs, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Dry goods grocer, Can read and write, Owns home free of mortgage
Addie M. Baines, Wife, W, F, Born April, 1879, 21 yrs old, Married 0 yrs, 0 children, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Can read and write
Floyd Swicegood, Lodger, W, M, Born 1882, 18 yrs old, Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Dry goods salesman





The house and general store across the road from the Barnes Cemetery. It was Avery Lawrence Barnes home and store. He had been crippled from illness as a toddler.

They had 3 children before Avery died of spinal meningitis:

1) Gilmer Lawrence Barnes (DOB 1/8/1901 in Davidson County, NC; DOD 3/27/1982 in Davidson County, NC; Buried Bethel Cemetery, One of Two Cemeteries of Tyro Methodist Church, Hwy 150, Davidson County, NC) married Mackie Lucille Meacham (DOB 3/14/1903 in Davidson County, NC; DOD 2/9/1988 in Davidson County, NC). They had Wayne Meacham Barnes, Annie Ruth Barnes Barnes, Norine Caroline Barnes Walser, Angeline Virginia Barnes Walser, Edwin Lawrence Barnes, Edna Lucille Barnes Bingham.

2) Vivian Mae Barnes

3) Ossie Maxine "Bill" Barnes (DOB 10/21/1905 in Davidson County, NC; DOD 9/24/1994 in Davidson County, NC; Buried Davidson County, NC; Buried Barnes Cemetery, Next To Churchland Baptist Church, Hwy 150, Davidson County, NC). Never married.

Avery Lawrence Barnes, Addie Mae Michael, Gilmer Lawrence Barnes (between his parents), Vivian Mae Barnes Huneycutt in her father's lap and Ossie Maxine Barnes in her mother's lap.


1910 U.S. Census of Boone, Davidson County, North Carolina; Roll: T624_1106; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 20; Image: 623, Lines 33-36, "Addie M. Barnes"
Addie M. Barnes, Head, F(emale), W(hite), 31 yrs old (DOB 1879), Widowed, 3 children with 3 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Can read & write, Housekeeper of boarding house, Owns home
Gilmer Barnes, Son, M, W, 9 yrs old (DOB 1901), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Juliun M. Barnes (sic, should be Vivian M. Barnes), Daughter, F, W, 4 yrs old (DOB 1906), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Issie M. Barnes (sic, should be Ossie M. Barnes), Daughter, F, W, 3 yrs old (DOB 1907), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC



1920 U.S. Census of Tyro, Davidson County, North Carolina; Roll: T625_1295; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 41; Image: 754, Lines 14-17, "Ady Barnes"
Ady Barnes, Head, Owns home free of mortgage, Head, W(hite), F(emale), 41 yrs old (DOB 1879), Widowed, Can read & write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer of general farm
Gilmer Barnes, Son, W, M, 19 yrs old (DOB 1901), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, No occupation
Virginia Barnes (sic should be Vivian Barnes), Daughter, W, F, 15 yrs old (DOB 1905), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, No occupation
Oscar Barnes (sic, should be Ossie Barnes), Son (?), W, M, 14 yrs old (DOB 1906), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, No occupation






Oscar was a member of Cottonville Baptist Church, 4888 Plank Road, Cottonville, Norwood, Stanly County, NC when he was a younger man. The portrait of him wearing his Sunday School Pin was probably his wedding portrait. He was elected Church Clerk on 10/3/1922. He kept this position until 1926.


They moved their membership to the Aquadale Baptist Church, 32871 Church Street, Norwood, Stanly County, NC and remained there the remainder of their lives. Oscar was a Sunday School teacher and a Deacon. He moved his membership because he bought a farm in Aquadale and Aquadale Baptist Church was the closest church to their farm at the time.


Oscar married Vivian Mae Barneson 9/2/1922 in Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, NC. He sharecropped for awhile until he could buy his farm.


Oscar Alexander Huneycutt, probably wedding picture.


Vivian Mae Barnes, probably wedding picture.


May 1, 2004 and May 8, 2004 I went to the Huneycutt Reunion. I learned from Bill Honeycutt, Roy McIntyre, Lee Huneycutt and my Dad (Avery Huneycutt) that Grandpa W.E. Huneycutt was a sharecropper and rented the Holbrook place. Uncle Lee and Dad took me out to the Holbrook place and I got some pictures. Between Aquadale and Cottonville, on Plank Rd, take a left just before Cottonville Baptist Church on Cottonville Rd. Take a left on Eddins-Poplin Rd and go .5 miles. There are currently 2 modern houses on both sides of the street. They are 8649 and 8650 Eddins-Poplin Rd. The old house was on the right up a rise by a huge tree. It's no longer there. The shop was on the left side of the road down a dip in front of the modern house. It's no longer there. Uncle Lee pointed out the fields on the right side of the road to the right of the old homeplace. There are 2 hills and then some trees. He said there was a family of blacks that helped them sharecrop and they lived in those woods. He said you would make 4 bundles of corn. They picked up 3 of the bundles in the wagons but the 4th bundle was for the owner, it was the rent.

Big tree on 8649 and 8650 Eddins Poplin Rd where the old Holcombe place house was.


Tree on 8649 and 8650 Eddins Poplin Rd where the old Holcombe place barn was, across the street from the old house.

Then they told me that Oscar Huneycutt bought his farm, formerly known as the Sims-Curlee place, which was probably around 100 acres close toAquadale (where they lived the rest of their lives). 32004 Bethlehem Church Road, Norwood, Stanly County, NC. Corner of Bethlehem Church Road and Old Aquadale Road. Some of his farm was across Old Aquadale Road. The original old house was located behind the newer house (built in the early to mid 1950's) at 35.239515 , -80.238588 . The newer house that Papa built is located at 35.239752 , -80.238717 . The old well house was located about here 35.239506 , -80.238838 . It had a smoke house on the back of it. The wash house, wood house and garage was located about here 35.239574 , -80.238871 . The upper barn was located about here 35.239380 , -80.238694 . The original "old" barn was located about here 35.239343 , -80.238941 . The biggest lower barn was located 35.239754 , -80.238501 .

At that time Grandpa Will Huneycutt bought what was later the Bryant Smith place. The original home is still there but everything is grown up now so you can't see it from the road. We were too afraid to go up the gravel drive to the house. It's just across the road from Papa's farm. (I believe it is at 35.234928, -80.237909.) After Grandma Eva Malinda Boone Huneycutt died, Papa, Uncle Lee and Grandpa built Grandpa's newer 4 room home on the hill directly behind Papa's farm (across the road from the original house). He also built a shop/barn behind the newer house. Coming from Aquadale on the Aquadale Rd, the Bryant Smith place is a gravel driveway on the left. Papa's driveway went from Bethlehem Church Road (NC 1917) to his house, then by the house, the well house and down the back to the Old Aquadale Road (NC 2001). At the bottom of that old driveway was Grandpa Huneycutt's new house (12430 Old Aquadale Road, 35.236991, -80.238207). They moved his shop behind his house to the right and up a hill. It's no longer there. Currently Grandpa's newer house is still there but it is so grown up that you can't see the house from the road very good. There were 2 trailers behind Grandpa's newer house 2004. Grandpa sold the land except for the bit where his newer house and shop are. The Bryant Smith's bought the older original house and lived there while my Daddy was growing up. After Grandpa Huneycutt died, SpurgeonAda Huneycutt moved into that house. Spurgeon was Grandpa Huneycutt's nephew, son of his brother Zecharian Montgomery "Uncle Gum" Huneycutt. That must have been when Papa got Grandpa Huneycutt's bellows, anvil and some tools. Papa sold some land to the Solite Plant in the early 1950's. It's across the road from their houses down Walnut Street at 35.231645 , -80.242743. Grandpa Huneycutt died in 1948 so I'm not sure who sold part of his land (heirs?) to the Carolina Solite Corp., Aquadale Plant. Dad said Papa only sold maybe 5 acres of otherwise unusable land (pretty rocky). Solite began operating in Aquadale in 1953, producing lightweight aggregate for the construction industry. The facility is regulated as a boiler and industrial furnace (BIF) under state and federal hazardous waste laws and regulations. The facility produces lightweight aggregate by heating slate and shale mined in an onsite quarry in four large rotary kilns. As the shale and slate are heated, gases are released causing them to expand. The expanded product, referred to as Solite®, is lightweight, fire resistant, weather resistant, and provides insulating properties. It is used in construction for masonry rocks and concrete. The Solite facility primarily consists of a quarry from which shale and slate are extracted, an inactive quarry, a storage and handling area for the raw material, the rotary kiln process area, and product storage and handling areas. The facility encompasses approximately 125 acres.

Papa dipped snuff all his life. His brand was Old Navy.

During the Great Depression, Oscar still owed about $300.00 on the farm. The bank wanted to foreclose on Oscar's farm so they could take over the land and sell it for a profit. But a friend. Arthur Mauldin, loaned him the money to help him keep it. Arthur was 12 years older and already owned his farm and had some money. In the 1930 U.S. Census, Maulden was living in the Tyson area not too far away from Oscar, just 5 pages over, both on "New Albemarle Road". He saw Papa was a hard worker and trustworthy person so he went with Papa to the bank and paid the loan off and made the bank give him the deed. Papa diligently paid the friend back and never borrowed another cent for the rest of his life. He hired himself and his two mules out for .25/day during the worst times. Sometimes he would drive the mules to Albemarle in the morning (10 miles) to hire himself and his mules out to do grading work and foundations for homes. Then he'd have to drive the mules back home at night. It was an hour drive to Albemarle and an hour back after working 12-14 hours.

Arthur Anderson Maulden/Mauldin (DOB 1/23/1886 in NC to George Anderson Maulden and Nancy Caroline Holt; DOD 1/25/1972 in Monroe, Union County, NC of terminal pneumonia due to organic brain syndrome and other contributing factor was cerebral arteriosclerosis; Buried at Silver Springs Baptist Church, 16072 NC 138 Hwy, Norwood, Stanly County, NC) married to Nora Bell Scott (DOB 11/17/1891 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 5/6/1944 in Stanly County, NC of pneumonia of right lung broncho type exacerbated due to severe deforming arthritis). They had 3 girls and a boy: Vera Carolin Maulden, Rosa Belle Maulden, George Benton Maulden and Bessie Lee Mauldin.


Papa seated in front of his house on the old Sims Curlee place.



This was the original house on Papa's farm and they lived in this house until Dad was in high school

Papa and Grandma lived through many technological changes that changed human history. I wrote about this. See my post on "What Technology Changes Did My Papa See".

Papa had a 1920's Fordson tractor. It was used when Papa bought it (no magneto but square box coils and you had to keep those coils in good condition for it to start). Ford started building Fordson tractors in 1917-1918 but Papa's didn't have ladder sides so it was later than that. Fordsons were cheap and Ford sold a lot of them. In late 1920's Ford quit making the tractors in America and moved the plant to Ireland so Papa's was between 1920 and the late 1920's when Ford moved the plant to Ireland. One day Papa went to the John Deere dealership owned by William Horace Bowers, Bowers Implement Co in Albemarle. Bowers had traded some tractors for old Fordsons and Papa needed parts for his old Fordson and went there. Bowers asked Papa why he didn't buy a new tractor but the War was going on and they just weren't available. Everything went to the War effort. So Papa said he would but couldn't get one. Bowers told him he had 3 new tractors sitting on a railroad siding somewhere waiting to come in and Papa said he would take one of them. He ordered it in the Fall of 1944 but it didn't come in until the Spring 1945. Moving soldiers and war materiel took priority which was why it sat for so long. When it finally came in they put on bigger tires and then delivered it by truck. It is a John Deere H model 1944. It cost $700 and he paid in full. Avery was home when they delivered it. They pulled the truck up to the ditch in the front at the road to unload it. Avery remembers that day and was very excited. It was a big day for an 8 yr old boy. Papa took Avery for a ride (from front of their house it was out the driveway, took a right and to the bottom of the hill and back). Uncle Lee used to walk it to Palmerville to use it to plow farms for money. He would stay with Papa's friend, Harloe Hicks and his family for 6 weeks or so and plow from dawn to dusk on farms along NC 740 Hwy in the Badin area. Papa would do construction work over there too. He would go home at night and bring gas for the tractor the next morning.

During this time together, in 2004, Roy, Bill, Lee and Dad talked about fishing with Grandpa Huneycutt. They used to fish at Long Creek. Dad took me over there. The road used to be a gravel road but it has been paved. The new road doesn't follow the old road exactly. There is a new bridge too up from the old one that was so close to the water. The old bridge was built with a slant so it wouldn't get washed away. I took some pictures of Long Creek in the direction of the old Lower Bridge and the other direction where they used to fish on Long Creek. This road was NC 138 Hwy. From Aquadale turn right beside the old rock service station. Behind the old rock service station is a small rock house with a rounded enty porch roof. Dad said that Uncle Pink (ney Boon) lived in that house. Now, if you take Aquadale Rd to Papa's and turn left at the cross roads at the corner of Papa's old farm...that road also used to be a gravel road. This also has a bridge over Long Creek called the High Bridge. It was washed out in the 1940's. Dad said he remembered one of the Howard men talking about walking over the bridge when it was covered by the flood. He said it was up to his knees and the bridge was shaking. He evidently made it across but what a stupid thing to do and it was washed out. That bridge sits high over the river and it was hard to imagine the water being over the bridge. I remember when these roads were still gravel. But they are now paved. The High Bridge is still the old wooden one-lane bridge that was placed in 1940's.

Looking from new bridge over Long Creek towards Grandpa Huneycutt's fishing hole where he fell in while fishing for carp just before he died. May, 2004


Pilings on Long Creek are where the old lower bridge was.


I have these from my Dad's days of fishing with his Grandpa Huneycutt.


Papa would drive his 1936 Plymouth car to the Brushy Mountains, called "the Brushies" by locals, in the Fall to get bushels of apples. He would take the back seat out of his 2 door sedan and put as many apples as he could. When he got back home they would work up what they wanted of them and he would sell the rest to make extra money. The Brushy Mountains are a mountain range located in northwestern North Carolina. They are an isolated "spur" of the much larger Blue Ridge Mountains, separated from them by the Yadkin River valley. A deeply eroded range, they move from the southwest to the northeast, and cross five counties in North Carolina: Caldwell, Alexander, Wilkes, Iredell, and Yadkin.

Brushy Mountains


The Brushy Mountains divide, for much of their courses, the waters of the Yadkin River and the Catawba River, two of central North Carolina's largest rivers. The range is approximately 45 miles long, but only 4 to 8 miles wide. The highest point in the chain is Pores Knob (2,680 feet), in Wilkes County. Among the other notable peaks in the range are Hibriten Mountain in Caldwell County, which marks the western end of the Brushy Mountains and is a prominent landmark in the city of Lenoir, North Carolina; Hickory Knob, the highest point in Alexander County, North Carolina; and Fox Mountain, the highest point inIredell County, North Carolina. The "Brushies", as they are often called by locals, usually rise from 300 to 800 feet above the surrounding countryside, with few peaks rising more than a thousand feet above their base The forests on the mountains are part of the Southeastern mixed forests ecoregion.

The Mountains are primarily known for their abundance of apple orchards, and the Brushy Mountain Apple Festival is held in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina each year to celebrate the harvest. The region was also once known as a hotbed of "moonshining", or the production of illegal homemade liquor. Several of the earliest stars of stock-car racing in the 1940s and 1950s got their start in the moonshining business in the Brushy Mountains. James Larkin Pearson, a newspaper publisher and editor who served as North Carolina's official Poet Laureate from 1953 to 1981, was born and raised in the Brushy Mountains, and lived in the Brushies his entire life. Much of his poetry was based on his life in the Brushy Mountains.

1930 U.S. Census of New Albemarle Rd., Tyson, Stanly, North Carolina; Roll: 1721; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 22; Image: 1037, Lines 10-13, "Oscar A. Honeycutt" (sic, should be Huneycutt)
Oscar A. Honeycutt, Owns farm, no radio set, Head, M(ale), W(hite), 31 yrs old (DOB 1899), Married at age 23 yrs old, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer of general farm
Vivian Honeycutt, Wife, F, W, 26 yrs old (DOB 1904), Married at age 18 yrs old, Can read and write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Ruth Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 6 yrs old (DOB 1924), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Lee Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 1 yrs old (DOB 1929), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC




Oscar had a Model A before their 1936 Plymouth. Uncle Cecil West (Papa's son-in-law) rebuilt the motor of the 1936 Plymouth several times because, back then, the motors wouldn't last but 40k-50k miles despite good care. After the War, Papa was able to buy a 1941 Plymouth.

1936 Plymouth Coupe



1941 Plymouth


In the summer, he would take the backseat out of the Plymouth and they would cram it full of bushels of vegetables. Dad would stand behind the driver's seat and they would drive to Lexington, NC. In Lexington they had a community pressure cooker, cannery and pea shellers. It would be an all day job to shuck the corn and get it canned, shell peas, etc. Sometimes they stayed overnight with family. They would drive to Davidson county to visit Grandma's family for a day trip or overnight stay anyway.

Vivian was a very hard worker, even helping pick cotton. In fact, they all picked cotton, even their baby, my Dad! He remembers having the long cotton bags and having to pick rows of cotton.

Photo of a couple picking cotton (found on the Internet).


Oscar was a farmer and a very good carpenter all of his life. He worked with Marshall Hatley who was a very good carpenter and he taught Papa a lot. Marshall and Papa worked together in building houses many times. Marshall Alton Hatley (DOB 1/26/1886 in Stanly County, NC to William Hatley and Sarah Boone; DOD 5/21/1971 in Stanly County Hospital, Albemarle, Stanly County, NC of coronary occlusion) was married to Lucy Arabelle Smith (DOB 5/5/1893 in Stanly County, NC to James F. Smith and Lizzie L. Harward; DOD 5/25/1980 in Albemarle, Stanly County, NC). Sarah Boone Hatley was a daughter of William Peter Boone and was Eva Malinda Boon Huneycutt's sister. So Oscar and Marshall were 1st cousins, as well as friends and co-workers.

William Peter Boon and Mary Jane Smith Boon
Sarah Boon Hatley.................................Eva Malinda Boon Huneycutt
Marshall Alton Hatley...........................Oscar Alexander Huneycutt

Oscar and Vivian Huneycutt had 3 children:
1) Ruth Audrey Huneycutt (DOB 7/12/1923 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 3/24/1996 in Stanly County, NC) married Cecil Bob West (DOB 7/19/1918 in Stanly County, NC to Crowell Marshall West and Ethel Carrie Thompson; DOD 5/26/1997 in Stanly County, NC). They had Barbara Jean West Curlee, Brenda Catherine West Barrier, Robert Cecil West.

2) Lee Wilson Huneycutt (DOB 1928 in Stanly County, NC; DOD ) married Mary Eloise Coggins (DOB 2/13/1928 in NC to Charles C. Coggins and Elizabeth Stoker; DOD 1/27/2010 in Albemarle, Stanly County, NC). No children.

3) William Avery Huneycutt My Dad! (DOB 1936 in Stanly County, NC; DOD ) married Eleanor Elaine Reese My Mom! (DOB 1938 in Greenville, Greenville County, SC; DOD ). They had Sharon Lynn Huneycutt Harris (Me!), Margaret Elaine Huneycutt Harris, Melinda Kathryn Huneycutt McMillion.



My Dad, William Avery Huneycutt, is the baby in front. The boy on the right with the overalls is his older brother, Lee Wilson Huneycutt and the tall girl in back is their older sister, Ruth Audrey Huneycutt. The other children are cousins but I don't know who they are. If you can identify any of them, please contact me at Mom25dogs@gmail.com


1940 U.S. Census of New Albemarle Road, Tyson, Stanly County, North Carolina; Roll: T627_2975; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 84-28, Lines 2-3, "William E. Honeycutt", Lines 4-8, "Oscar A. Honeycutt", Lines 9-15, "George R. Honeycutt" (sic, Huneycutt)
William E. Honeycutt, Head, Owns farm valued at $400, M(ale), W(hite), 63 yrs old (DOB 1876), Widowed, Attended school thru 6th grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935, Farmer
Vernie M. Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 31 yrs old (DOB 1909), Single, Attended school thru 3rd grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
Oscar A. Honeycutt, Head, Owns farm valued at $250, M(ale), W(hite), 41 yrs old (DOB 1899), Married, Attended high school 3 yrs, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935, Farmer
Vivian M. Honeycutt, Wife, F, W, 36 yrs old (DOB 1904), Married, Attended school thru 8th grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
Ruth A. Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 16 yrs old (DOB 1924), Single, Attends school, Attended high school 3 yrs, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
Lee W. Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 10 yrs old (DOB 1930), Single, Attends school, Attended school thru 6th grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
W. Avery Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 3 yrs old (DOB 1937), Born in NC
George R. Honeycutt, Head, Rents farm for $5, M(ale), W(hite), 46 yrs old (DOB 1894), Married, Attended school thru 7th grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935, Farmer
Esther M. Honeycutt, Wife, F, W, 37 yrs old (DOB 1903), Married, Attended high school 3 yrs, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
Barbara Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 13 yrs old (DOB 1927), Single, Attends school, Attended school thru 8th grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
Prudence Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 11 yrs old (DOB 1929), Single, Attends school, Attended school thru 6th grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
Jane Honeycutt, Daughter, F, W, 7 yrs old (DOB 1933), Single, attends school, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935
Calvin J. Honeycutt, Son, M, W, 3 yrs old (DOB 1937), Born in NC
Eliza Honeycutt, Mother, F, W, 77 yrs old (DOB 1863), Widowed, Attended school thru 3rd grade, Born in NC, Lived in same place in 1935



These are photos of my Dad, Avery Huneycutt.





This one is his older sister, Ruth, pretending to give him a spanking.




Papa had to register for the WWII draft too!


Papa went with his cousin and friend, Marshall Alton Hatley, to build Great Grandma Addie Mae Michael Barnes (his mother-in-law) a little house. Papa worked in carpentry with Marshall a good bit in the early years. Marshall lived out of Oakboro going towards Big Lick. He was about Papa's age. Dad said they camped in Granny Barnes house as they built it and they about froze to death while they did it. It was a 4 room house but they never finished the 4th room. It was used for storage. They didn't put ceilings or plaster in it. The living room had a fireplace, the kitchen had a wood cooking stove and the bedroom that Granny Barnes and Aunt Bill shared had a little iron stove for heating. I remember visiting them one time. They used an outhouse which shocked me. The kitchen had no cabinets or sink, no indoor plumbing. She had a bench by the back door with 2 buckets on it. I have that bench today. Those were the well buckets. She used an aluminum dishpan as a sink. The table was the only countertop. I remember thinking the house was so tiny, cluttered. But Dad remembers how Granny Barnes made yeast rolls that he loved. He loved the smell and taste of them. I have a picture of her holding a big cake she had made.


Granny Addie Mae Michael Barnes beside the house that Papa and Marshall Hatley built for her and her daughter, Aunt Bill Barnes.

Papa would go to Sandhills, NC to pick peaches to make money. He would come back with the car full of bushels of peaches for them to work up. They may have sold peaches like he did the apples too. The Sandhills is a region in the interior of the U.S. states of North Carolina and South Carolina. It is a strip of ancient beach dunes which generally divides the Piedmont from the coastal plain, and is the evidence of a former coastline when the ocean level was higher, or the land lower. The beach deposits were formed principally during the Miocene Epoch, circa 20 million years ago. Typical beach fossils are found along the front edges. The coastal plain is terraced from other ocean levels, but none appear to have been so long-lasting, so as to build up dunes of this size. Because they are predominantly porous, sandy soils, the area tends to be droughty and irrigation is required for agriculture. Some areas are noted for peach production, primarily because peaches need a well drained soil. Prior to agricultural use, most of the Sandhills were forested with Longleaf Pine, Loblolly Pine, Turkey oak, and Blackjack oak. In areas of extreme drainage, the forests are visibly scrubby. Oaks increase under conditions of wildfire exclusion, whereas Longleaf Pine will dominate under a regime of frequent fires.




When he was about 11-12 years old, Avery would take over on the tractor after Papa did the first few rows and finish the field. They would do 5 acres in cotton for the cash crop. In fall Papa would plant oats or wheat. In Spring he sowed clover that came up in the wheat stubble. They cut the clover for seed in the Fall when it was time to seed the wheat. Sell the extra clover seed. Rotated between cotton and the wheat and clover. Then grew corn for their hogs and later milo. Uncle Henry Hinson and Aunt Allie worked together at hog killing time with Papa and Grandma.

Avery was very involved in the 4-H in his area. He learned how to square dance at school and said he was pretty good at it. His high school class was fairly small compared to mine. I had 800 in my graduating class! But he had grown up with all his peers and he enjoyed going back to the 50th High School Reunion.

Not only did they work so hard during the week, but come Sunday they took the day off and went to church. Papa and Grandma would attend the nearest church which was Aquadale First Baptist Church. Some of their neighbors on the way into Aquadale, were the Harwoods. They didn't attend church much despite it just being 2-3 miles down the road. They had a store and a seed cleaner business. Eventually they built their own church, Bethlehem Baptist Church, 32270 Bethlehem Church Road, Norwood, Stanly County, NC, but they started meeting in the seed cleaning business. Dad says it's a nice church now.





Photos were found on Stanly County Museum FB page





You needed a seed cleaner after you combined and got the seeds and roughage up. You took it to the seed cleaner and they would take it and give you back clean seed in bags. Dad remembers riding the tractor to the Harwood's store to return Coke bottles and picking up stuff they needed. Papa took his seed to the Harwood's for cleaning. He also took his wheat and corn to the Aquadale mill there for grinding into chicken feed, grits, cornmeal and flour. You checked in your bushels of wheat and checked out in pounds of flour, etc. They had to shell their corn themselves and then had it ground. Dad barely remembers when men were still cutting their grain with hand reaper. They would reap, then men would go, farm to farm, baling the hay. It was baled with wire.

There was a molasses mill behind the grain mill in Aquadale. Papa would plant about 10 rows of orange cane (not sugar cane). They would cut it and remove the leaves and tops and stack it like cordwood in the wagon and haul it to the molasses mill where it was crushed and squeezed until the juice ran out into buckets. Then it had to be boiled to concentrate and was jugged in brown apothecary jars. It was another all day process.

They raised two kinds of peanuts. They raised the Spanish peanut which has a white skin and only had two nuts. But they were easy to grow and shell. They grew in bunches so you could pull up the plant and knock it against a bucket and the nuts popped out. The other kind were the red peanuts which have the red skin but more nuts per goober. They didn't boil peanuts as that was a low country innovation. But they would shell them and Grandma would then wash them in her agitate washer to get all dirt off of them. Then they spread them on a tin roof to dry. They would have to rake them off if rain was coming before they were finished drying. Often they put them in the wood stove oven to roast them and sometimes Grandma would fry them in the frying pan in butter.

Papa had a raised bed in a fence for growing sweet potatoes. In the spring he would begin preparing the bed with horse manure, sawdust and loose dirt. He would plant the sweet potatoes and place ising glass on top. After they stored what they needed he would sell sweet potatoes for extra money.

When Dad went to school, he always took his lunch. It would be a tomato sandwich in the summer, a jelly butter biscuit, peanut butter and crackers or some leftovers. Grandma did buy peanut butter despite raising peanuts. She made their bread, mostly biscuits. She'd make biscuits at least once a day, often twice a day. She rolled her biscuits in her hands, shaped them and placed them in the pan and put a dab of lard on the top of each. She made the best biscuits. Papa had to have his breakfast every morning so she was up and cooking the full breakfast: biscuits, eggs, ham/bacon/sausage, grits with red eye gravy, coffee that he drank from his saucer, not his cup. She would prepare 2 jelly biscuits for Papa to take with his lunch. One for him and one for Papa to give Brenda, their granddaughter. Papa also liked Yankee Rice (a plate of rice and butter with sugar sprinkled on it). She also made a wonderful coconut cake. She bought a real coconut and did it all from scratch. Her coconut cake was well known. She cooked with a wood cooking stove.

In the early 1950's, after Papa had sold some land to build the Solite Plant, he began to build a new house. It was beside the old house but facing Bethlehem Church Road. Dad helped him after school. It's where he learned carpentry.



The front door is at the top of the drawing and the back door is at the bottom of the drawing. It's as close to what I can remember. Papa and Grandma's bedroom was the hall bedroom. The house had a stairway to the attic and the room over the front bedroom and living room (see the attic window over front door) was a private room for my Dad while he was still at home. It was too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter but it gave him a place to store his own stuff. We, as guests, would stay in the front bedroom when we came to visit. The 3 girls would bed down on pallets on the floor around the bed.

In their "new" house Grandma had an electric stove on one end of her kitchen with the wood cooking stove opposite on the other wall. I remember her using the wood stove as much or more than the electric stove. They would use the electric stove when it was too hot in the summer or when they needed temperature control such as using the pressure cooker for canning. She had a small pantry off the kitchen (behind the wood cooking stove) and that's where she stored her canned goods. Eventually she got a huge chest freezer in the barn and she did less canning in jars and more freezing.


Papa and Grandma standing between the old house and the new house. The new well house is behind them.

They didn't have hot water in the house until I was a teenager and they were older. They didn't like their "new" well water. It was hard water and left rust stains. So although they had the new well with an electric pump to the house, they still used the old well and drew water for most everything. She also had an electric stove on one side of the kitchen but only used that on the hottest days. She preferred using her wood kitchen stove on the other side of the kitchen. My Dad still has that old wood kitchen stove. So every morning, someone got her wood from the wood house and she started a fire in the kitchen stove. She heated water on that stove or cooked on that stove most of the time (except on the hottest summer days when a wood fire make the kitchen unbearable and she would relent and use the electric stove). When it was time to take a bath or wash dishes, she heated water on one of the stoves and poured it in the bathtub or sink. This was so unknown to me as we always had hot/cold running water in our houses. I was truly disgusted to take a bath in used bath water (after my sisters) so I always tried to be first. To this day, if there is a line waiting to take a shower/bath, I subconsciously try to be first even though my reason no longer applies as we all have fresh running water to bathe in. But it was such a big deal to haul water from the well house and heat it on the wood stove just to take a bath that I can now understand why you re-used water. But I'm glad I don't have to do that today! In their later years, my Dad and his brother and sister insisted their parents get air conditioning (2 window units for their living room and bedroom), a hot water heater and a washing machine (still no dryer) . This would have been in the 1970's! But they weren't as far behind the times as others I knew who actually didn't have an indoor bathroom in their homes until the 1970's! I would never have wanted to live like they did but I feel privileged to have gotten to experience the last of that kind of lifestyle. A time before air conditioning, running hot/cold water in the house, cooking over a woodstove, canning your food, washing clothes in a wash pot, black and white TV with 3 channels, etc.

The old house sat behind the new house for many years. Avery, Lee, Ruth and the families came and worked together to tear it down. Dad kept the door, hoover cabinet, and fireplace mantle and some of the screened windows. They are stored in his storage barn along with many other things he saved from his family or at my house in my attic. Oscar built 3 barns, a wash house, a well house, a wood house, a chicken house and a garage. Dad saved Oscar's chicken house and brought it to his farm in Inman, SC. I have their original wooden kitchen table (that was in the old house). It was made for them by Grandpa Huneycutt. One of the chairs he made is in the possession of another granddaughter, Barbara West Curlee.




Grandma always had feral barn cats that she fed table scraps to. But near the end of his life, Papa had a Siamese cat named Trixie that he kept inside and loved to death. Trixie was mean to everyone but Papa and that tickled him.

He loved his grandchildren and always welcomed us. He liked to tease us and I can still hear his laugh. Melinda was a little chubby so he teased her by calling her "Fatty Arbuckles". We didn't know who that was until we were middle-aged and read about comedian, Fatty Arbuckles, in the old silent movies. We remember Sunday afternoons when we had a big lunch after church and then we all went outside to sit around the big walnut tree in the backyard. Because they didn't have air conditioning until their later years, this was the coolest place. They brought the chairs outside and the men would whittle and talk while the women would work on produce (string beans, peel peaches, shuck corn, etc) and talk. The kids would lie on quilts on the grass and fall asleep listening to the grown-ups talk. I can hear them all laughing now while Dad, Papa, and Uncle Lee would whittle sticks into wood curls underneath their feet.

His only grandson, Robert, remembers his Papa picking him up on the way into town on Saturdays. He would take Robert with him. Robert remembers on the way home he would stop at the store and buy him a 6 1/2 oz bottle of Coke and peanuts. Robert loved that because he loved having his very own bottle of Coke, one he didn't have to share with his sisters!

After Papa and Grandma died, their 3 children cleaned out the house and had an estate auction as per their instructions in their will. We all got to buy things that meant something special to us. After Aunt Ruth and Uncle Cecil died they had an auction too and we got to get some things that meant a lot to us. Also, the three of them had to clean out Great Aunt Bill's (Ossie "Bill" Maxine Barnes) house where Granny Barnes had lived with her. The house Papa built. They each got to take special things. From these sources, we have ended up with personal items and interesting things that mean a lot to us. I have little notebooks that Papa used for his carpentry work that lists what he charged and cost of materials. He always would end the job and have "Paid In Full" marked over the job. These notebooks were from the 1960's and he charged $1.35-$2.25 per hour for himself. One notebook started in 1958 and ended in 1962. His friend, Grady Howard, often helped him on his jobs. Papa liked a certain style nail apron and Grandma made them for him. I have two of these handmade nail aprons. I also have notebooks where he listed his income for each year with notations as to whether the income was from his farm or his carpentry. In 1959 he made $2,912.01. In 1960 he made $2,718.40. In 1961 he made $3,117.84. In 1962 he made $2,056.92. I also have some of his checkbooks during the years that Dad was in Mars Hill College. I have a legal document from the U.S. Army requesting that he allow them to use his 55.72 acres for field exercises from 8/1964-12/1964. Papa signed it with T.L. Harwood as his witness.

I remember drinking out of the dipper from the old well and helping Grandma wash on wash day using the old wringer, the iron pot over a wood fire in the wash house. She would boil the clothes in soapy water in the huge iron pot. Then she rinsed and wrung them dry through an old wringer. She then hung them out to dry on clothes line strung from the wash house to the well house. Grandma didn't learn to drive until after Oscar died and was very proud of herself for getting her licence. She kept a loaded gun over the back porch door to shoot birds with when she saw them eating out of her garden or trees. She was an excellent shot. She collected irises and had a large bed of all different kinds. She canned and kept a freezer full of fresh vegetables. She was known for her fig preserves and canned green beans then frozen beans. She was a wonderful country cook. When we visited she topped our breakfast off with a cup of coffee with extra cream and heavy sugar. That was the ONLY time we ever got coffee. It was a treat! She sewed and made most of her clothes. She collected recipes and was interested in poetry. I have her collection of recipes, poetry and childhood writings. She also made quilts and I have some of her quilt tops and quilt squares. For my wedding present she gave me a box of canned vegetables in pint jars. The summer before we got married, Grandma showed me how to can green beans and we did it together.






Papa with his Siamese cat, Trixie.



These tools are what my Dad has left of his Grandpa William Eli Huneycutt's blacksmith tools. He still has them in his storage barn.




Papa and Grandma's 50th Wedding Anniversary Party. I have this handmade ceramic 50th Wedding Anniversary gift was probably made by their daughter, Aunt Ruth Huneycutt West.



Grandma after Papa died and at her granddaughter's wedding, 6/1979. (Margaret Elaine Huneycutt Harris' wedding)



That's me sitting on top of Papa's John Deere tractor. Dad was helping his father, Oscar, fix something on the tractor. Dad loved this tractor and still has it today. This picture was taken at one of Papa's barns.



Here is Dad with his father's tractor. Many years later he drove it in a Parade of Power at a tractor show in Spartanburg, SC. It is now stored in his storage barn.



This is a signature quilt that I got from my Grandma's estate sale. It has the names of family and friends.



Two of Grandma's dresses that she sewed herself. I still have them.



I also have a collection of some of her hats. They were found in the attic and my sister, Melinda, got them at the estate sale.












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