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Monday, March 31, 2014

Joseph Lamb and Frances Beeson

Nansemond County, VA (Information from Wikipedia)
In 1634, the King of England directed the formation of eight shires (or counties) in the colony of Virginia. One of these was Elizabeth City Shire, which included land area on both sides of Hampton Roads. New Norfolk County was formed in 1636 from Elizabeth City Shire. It included all the area in South Hampton Roads now incorporated in the five independent cities located there in modern times. In 1637, New Norfolk County was divided into Upper Norfolk County and Lower Norfolk County. Upper Norfolk County became Nansemond County in 1646. In 1910, Suffolk, the county seat since 1750, became an independent city, but remained the county seat.

Under the Virginia Company of London, in 1619, the area which became Nansemond County was included in Elizabeth Cittie [sic], a one of four large "boroughs", or "incorporations". In 1624, the Virginia Company lost its proprietary charter, and Virginia became a royal colony. In 1634, the King of England directed the formation of eight shires (or counties) in the colony. One of these was Elizabeth River Shire, which included land area on both sides of Hampton Roads, as had the earlier Elizabeth Cittie. Two years later, New Norfolk County was formed in 1636 from Elizabeth River Shire. It included all the area in South Hampton Roads now incorporated in the five independent cities located there in modern times. The following year, in 1637, New Norfolk County was divided into Upper Norfolk County and Lower Norfolk County. Upper Norfolk County was officially redesignated the County of Nansimum by the House of Burgesses in March 1646; by the October session, this was also being spelled as Nansimund.


Bladen County, NC(Infomation from Wikipedia)

Bladen, Rowan and Anson Counties, NC

Bladen County was formed in 1734 as Bladen Precinct of Bath County, from New Hanover Precinct. It was named for Martin Bladen, a member of the Board of Trade. With the abolition of Bath County in 1739, all of its constituent precincts became counties.

Originally, Bladen was a vast territory with indefinite northern and western boundaries. Reductions in its extent began in 1750, when its western part became Anson County. In 1752 the northern part of Bladen County was combined with parts of Granville County and Johnston County to form Orange County. In 1754 the northern part of what was left of Bladen County became Cumberland County. In 1764 the southern part of what remained of Bladen County was combined with part of New Hanover County to form Brunswick County. In 1787 the western part of the now much smaller county became Robeson County. Finally, in 1808 the southern part of Bladen County was combined with part of Brunswick County to form Columbus County. Bladen County is considered the "mother county" of North Carolina because of the 100 counties in North Carolina, 55 of them at one point belonged to Bladen County. It is also the fourth largest county in North Carolina.


Anson County, NC (Information from Wikipedia)
The county was formed in 1750 from Bladen County. It was named for George Anson, Baron Anson, a British admiral, who circumnavigated the globe from 1740 to 1744, and later became First Lord of the Admiralty.

Like its parent county Bladen, Anson County was originally a vast territory with indefinite northern and western boundaries. Reductions in its extent began in 1753, when the northern part of it became Rowan County. In 1762 the western part of Anson County became Mecklenburg County. In 1779 the northern part of what remained of Anson County became Montgomery County, and the part east of the Pee Dee River became Richmond County. Finally, in 1842 the western part of Anson County was combined with the southeastern part of Mecklenburg County to become Union County.


Rowan County, NC (Information from Wikipedia)

Old Rowan County, NC







Old Rowan County, NC became these counties


The first Europeans to enter what is now Rowan County came with the Spanish expedition of Juan Pardo in 1567. They established a fort and a mission in the native village of Guatari, believed to be located near the Yadkin River and inhabited by the Wateree. At the time, the area was ruled by a female chief the Spaniards called Guatari Mico. The Spaniards called the village Salamanca in honor of the city of Salamanca in western Spain, and established a mission, headed by a secular priest named Sebastián Montero. The Spaniards abandoned the area at some point before 1572.

The county was formed in 1753 from the northern part of Anson County. It was named for Matthew Rowan, acting governor of North Carolina from 1753 to 1754. The county seat is Salisbury. Initially Rowan included the entire northwestern sector of North Carolina, with no clear western boundary, but its size was reduced as a number of counties were split off. The first big excision was to createSurry County in 1771. Burke and Wilkes Counties were formed from the western parts of Rowan and Surry in 1777 and 1778, respectively, leaving a smaller Rowan County that comprised present-day Rowan, Iredell (formed 1788), Davidson (1822), and Davie (1836). Surry, Burke and Wilkes subsequently fragmented further as well. Depending on where the ancestor lived, you may want to look at records for some of these later counties also. Records of very early land grants in the Rowan County area will be found with Anson County

Originally, Rowan County was a vast territory with an indefinite western boundary. Reductions in its extent began in 1770, when the eastern part of it was combined with the western part of Orange County to become Guilford County, North Carolina. In 1771 the northeastern part of what remained of Rowan County became Surry County. In 1777 the western part of Rowan County became Burke County. In 1788 the western part of the now much smaller Rowan County became Iredell County. In 1822 the eastern part of the still shrinking county became Davidson County. Finally, in 1836 the part of Rowan County north of the South Yadkin River became Davie County.


Guilford County, NC (Information from Wikipedia)
At the time of European encounter, the inhabitants of the area that became Guilford County were a Siouan-speaking people called the Saura. Beginning in the 1740s, settlers arrived in the region in search of fertile and affordable land. These first settlers included American Quakers from Pennsylvania, Maryland, and New England at what is now Greensboro, as well as German Reformed and Lutherans in the east, British Quakers in the south and west, and Scotch-Irish Presbyterians in the center of today's Guilford County. The county was formed in 1771 from parts of Rowan County and Orange County. It was named for Francis North, 1st Earl of Guilford, father of Frederick North, Lord North, British Prime Minister from 1770 to 1782.

Friedens Church, whose name means "peace" in German, is in eastern Guilford County, at 6001 NC Hwy 61 North, northwest of Gibsonville. It is a historic church that has operated continuously since the earliest European settlers came to this area. According to a history of the church, Rev. John Ulrich Giesendanner led his Lutheran congregation from Pennsylvania in 1740, into the part of North Carolina around Haw River, Reedy Fork, Eno River, Alamance Creek, Travis Creek, Beaver Creek and Deep River. The first building used by Friedens Church was made of logs in 1745 and served for 25 years. The second building, completed about 1771, was much more substantial and remained in use until it was replaced in May, 1871. The third building was destroyed by fire on January 8, 1939. Only the columns in front survived. The structure was rebuilt and reopened in May 1939.

The Quaker meeting played a major role in the European settlement of the county, and numerous Quakers still live in the county. New Garden Friends Meeting, established in 1754, still operates in Greensboro.

Alamance Presbyterian Church, a log structure, was built in 1762, though it was not officially organized until 1764 by the Rev. Henry Patillo, pastor of Hawfields Presbyterian Church. It has operated on the same site in present-day Greensboro since then. According to the church history, it is now using its fifth church building and now has its eighteenth pastor.

On March 15, 1781, the Battle of Guilford Court House was fought just north of present-day Greensboro between Generals Charles Cornwallis and Nathanael Greene during the American Revolution. This battle marked a key turning point in the Revolutionary War in the South. Although General Cornwallis, the British Commander, held the field at the end of the battle, his losses were so severe that he decided to withdraw to the Carolina and Virginia coastline, where he could receive reinforcements and his battered army could be protected by the British Navy. His decision ultimately led to his defeat later in 1781 at Yorktown, Virginia, by a combined force of American and French troops and warships.

In 1779 the southern third of Guilford County became Randolph County. In 1785 the northern half of its remaining territory became Rockingham County.

In 1808, Greensboro replaced the hamlet of Guilford Court House as the county seat.


Randolph County, NC (Information from Wikipedia)
Some of the first settlers of what would become the county were English Quakers, who settled along the Haw and Deep River. Eno Rivers.[4] The county was formed in 1779 from Guilford County. It was named for Peyton Randolph, first president of the Continental Congress. Randolph County was the original location of what became Duke University.

The county is home to one of the last remaining covered bridges in the state. The Pisgah Covered Bridge, in Union Township, is in the southwestern part of the county and was destroyed by a flood in 2003, but has been completely restored and is still standing.[5][6] In 1911, a new county called Piedmont County was proposed, with High Point as its county seat, to be created from Guilford, Davidson and Randolph Counties. Many people appeared at the Guilford County courthouse to oppose the plan, vowing to go to the state legislature to protest. The state legislature voted down the plan in February 1911.


Perquimas County, NC
Perquimans was formed as early as 1668 as a precinct in Albemarle County. It was named in honor of an Indian tribe. It is in the northeastern section of the State and is bounded by Albemarle Sound and Chowan, Gates, and Pasquotank counties. The present area is 261 square miles.... Hertford, established in 1758 on the land of Jonathan Phelps, is the county seat. There is no description of the precinct when it was established.

Gates was formed in 1779 from Chowan, Perquimans, and Hertford.

... that all that part of Hertford County that lies on the North East side of Chowan River, and all that part of Chowan and Perquimons Counties, that lies on the North Side of Katherine, and Warwick Creeks, and bounded as follows, (that is to say) Beginning at the Virginia line, on Chowan River, thence down the said River to the mouth of Katherine Creek; thence up the said Creek, to the mouth of Warwick Creek, thence up said Creek to the Head, thence a direct line to the Head of the Indian Branch in Perquimons County, thence down said Branch to the Great Dismal Swamp, thence a North east Course to the Virginia line thence Westerly along said line to the beginning, and all that part of Hertford, Chowan, and Perquimons Counties, included in said lines, shall be and is hereby established a County by the name of Gates.

The lines between Pasquotank and Perquimans, and Camden and Gates were ordered to be run in 1804; because of the difficulty of establishing and marking the lines in the Dismal Swamp, they had not been previously marked.

... beginning near the fork of Little River, and running northwardly to the south-west corner of a ridge, known by the Middle Ridge, then along the west side of said ridge, crossing Colonel John Hamilton's turnpike road, to the north-west corner thereof, thence a northwardly course to a ridge in the desart known by Colonel Jesse Eason's Ridge, then a north course to the line that divides this State from the State of Virginia.

The dividing line between the counties of Chowan, Perquimans, and Gates was authorized to be established in 1805.

... That the said commissioners ... shall begin the dividing line between the counties of Chowan and Perquimons, at such place on Yeopon river, above Elliot's mills, as they may think proper, due regard being had to the former reputed line, and shall run thence along the said reputed line to Sunday ridge road, and from the said road to the intersection of the line of Gates county, and thence along the said line, as far as it extends on the heads of Chowan and Perquimans counties, and shall make or cause to be made returns of their proceedings to each of the courts of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of the said counties to be deposited and kept among the records thereof; and the said lines when so extended and laid off, shall forever be established and confirmed as the dividing lines between the said counties.

In 1814 the act of 1805, establishing the boundary line between Perquimans, Chowan, and Gates, was amended by naming a new commissioner, which indicated that the line had not been established at that date.

In 1818 an act was passed which authorized the boundary line between Pasquotank and Perquimans to be run and marked. No description is given in the law.

The dividing line between Chowan and Perquimans was authorized to be run and marked in 1819.

... commissioners to complete running and marking the dividing lines between the counties of Chowan and Perquimons, ... shall commence running at the bridge in the lane called James Hataway's Senr. and run a direct course to Caleb Goodwin's bridge in Bear swamp, from thence a direct course to where the crane pond crosses the sandy ridge road, thence up the sandy ridge road to here the Gates county line crosses the said road ... the said commissioners shall cause to be made correct copies of their survey; one of which shall be filed in the Secretary's office and one in each of the Clerks offices of the court of pleas and quarter sessions in the counties of Chowan and Perquimons.

In 1819 the boundary line between Perquimans and Gates had not been established so as to be widely and definitely known. Therefore, an act was passed which authorized the establishment of said line. No description is given in the law.

(above from Formation of the North Carolina Counties, by David Leroy Corbitt, pp. 173-175, with corrections; published 1996 by North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Division of Archives and History.)



Joseph Lamb was born in 1735-1736 in Perquimans County, NC -

Family Data Collection - Individual Records, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2001,
Name: Joseph Lamb
Spouse: Frances Beeson
Parents: Henry Lamb
Birth Place: Nansemond Co, VA
Birth Date: 1736
Marriage Place: New Garden, Guilford Co
Marriage Date: 23 Jul 1761
Death Place: Randolph Co
Death Date: 1820

-or 1738 in Hopewell, Frederick County, Virginia

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2004
Name: Joseph Lamb
Gender: Male
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1738
Spouse Name: Frances Beeson
Spouse
Birth Place: NC
Spouse Birth Year: 1744
Marriage
Year: 1761
Marriage State: NC
Number Pages: 1
_____________________________________
Name: Frances Beeson
Gender: Female
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1744
Spouse Name: Joseph Lamb
Spouse
Birth Place: VA
Spouse Birth Year: 1738
Marriage
Year: 1761
Marriage State: NC
Number Pages: 1

His parents were Henry Lamb and Elizabeth Henley. Although Elizabeth being a Henley is debatable. Little is known of Elizabeth, wife of Henry Lamb. It's not been definitively proven. There is a record that gives his wife as "Gulielma". Was this a 2nd wife? Was Elizabeth actually Gulielma Elizabeth Henley? Or was the "Gulielma" record a mistake?

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2004
Name: Elizabeth Henly
Gender: Female
Spouse Name: Henry Lamb
Spouse
Birth Place: VA
Spouse Birth Year: 1696
Marriage
Year: 1720
Marriage State: NC
Number Pages: 1
_________________________________
Name: Elizabeth Henley
Gender: Female
Birth Year: 1725
Spouse Name: Henry Lamb
Spouse Birth Year: 1697
Number Pages: 1
_________________________________
Name: Elizabeth Henley?
Gender: Female
Birth Year: 1700
Spouse Name: Henry Lamb
Spouse Birth Year: 1697
Marriage
Year: 1739
Number Pages: 1
_________________________________
Name: Henry Lamb
Gender: Male
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1696
Spouse Name: Elizabeth Henly
Marriage
Year: 1720
Marriage State: NC
Number Pages: 1
___________________________________
Name: Henry Lamb
Gender: Male
Birth Year: 1697
Spouse Name: Elizabeth Henley?
Spouse Birth Year: 1700
Marriage
Year: 1739
Number Pages: 1
__________________________________
Name: Henry Lamb
Gender: Male
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1700
Spouse Name: Elizabeth
Spouse Birth Year: 1700
Marriage
Year: 1725
Number Pages: 1
________________________________
Name: Henry Lamb
Gender: Male
Birth Place: MA
Birth Year: 1697
Spouse Name: Gulielma
Spouse
Birth Place: NC
Spouse Birth Year: 1701
Marriage
Year: 1720
Marriage State: NC
Number Pages: 1


Family Data Collection - Individual Records, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2000
Name: Elizabeth Lamb
Parents: Henry Lamb, Elizabeth
Birth Place: Nansemond, VA
Birth Date: 1740
Death Place: Perquimans, NC
Death Date: 1801


American Genealogical-Biographical Index, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 1999
Name: Elizabeth Lamb
Birth Date: 1700
Volume: 99
Page Number: 178
Reference: Gen. Column of the " Boston Transcript". 1906-1941. The greatest single source of material for gen. Data for the N.E. area and for the period 1600-1800. Completely indexed in the Index.: 7 Jun 1909, 1054

Quaker records show on February 4, 1739 the family of Henry Lamb were in Nansemond County in southeastern Virginia.   At that time they requested permission to move to Perquimans County, North Carolina, where they stayed for 21 years. On October 1, 1760, Henry and some members of his family moved to Rowan County shortly before his death.

Note: According to the Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy Vol. 1 North Carolina page 57 Perquimans monthly meetings 1739, 2, 4, Lamb, Henry & family rocf Nancemund MM., VA.

Quaker records show on February 4, 1739 the family of Henry Lamb were in Nansemond County in southeastern Virginia. At that time they requested permission to move to Perquimans County, North Carolina, where they stayed for 21 years. On October 1, 1760, Henry and some members of his family moved to Rowan County shortly before his death.

Unfortunately the records in Nancemond CO., Virginia have been burned three times and Quaker records for that area were hidden (and probably lost to us forever) due to persecution of the Quakers for their stand on slavery.

Henry moved his wife and eight children to Perquimans Co., N.C. from Naunsemond Co., Va in 1739. He was a Quaker and the cruel treatment of that sect may have been part of the reason for his move.

The MM of Friends in Perquimans (sometimes called Walls, later Piney Woods) received the Lamb family on a certificate from Nansemond MM on 4 April 1739.

Patrick Laughley proves rights for importation of 13 people including Thomas Lamb and Henry Lamb. No information as to the date of this act or where the information came from. This could mean Thomas (3 generations earlier) had a brother, also named Henry.



Joseph's father, Henry Lamb, died 2/10/1761 in Old Rowan County, NC. Here is his will:

Original will found at City Hall, Salisbury, NC
The Will of Henry Lamb
In the name of God Amen, the Seventh Day of February in the year of Our Lord 1761, I Henry Lambe of the Parish of Saint Luke in the County of Rowan and Province of North Carolina being very sick and weak in body but of perfect mind and memory, thanks be given to God, there forecalling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament, that is to say, Principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of God that give it and for my body, I recommend it to the Earth to be buried in a Christing like manner at the discression of my executors and as touching such worthy estate wherewith it hath pleased God to Bless me in this life, I give and devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form Inprimis, it is my will and I do order that...

In the first place all my just debts and funeral charges be paid and satisfied.

Item, I give and bequeath unto Elizabeth, my dearly beloved wife, all and singular full power, authority, rite and title to all that is mine or belonging to me during her life if she continues a widow and at her death or marriage to be equally divided between Isau, Jacob, and; Joseph, Elizabeth and Bethia. Only reserving the wench (unreadable) to Joseph my son and to Jacob and Isau to have the wench Letty to Isau and Jacob. The land in (unreadable)To my sons Isau, Jacob and; Joseph if they live together, and if my son Isau will not come up here to live on the land, I leave the the hole land to my sons Jacob and; Joseph, whom I likewise constitute, make and order my only and sole executors of this my Last Will and Testament. Item, I give and bequeath unto my son, Thomas Lamb, Esau, and Mary a shilling a piece to be paid by my executors after my decease. Utterly disallowing revoke and disannul all and every other former Testaments Wills and Exed. by me in any ways before this time, named willed and bequeathed ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above mentioned. Before singing and sealing the two negro wenches disposed of the one named ____ to Joseph Lamb and the other wench named Leaty to Isaac and Jacob. Signed sealed pronounced and entered by the said Henry Lambe as his last will and testament in the presence of us the subscribors
Signed
Henerey (his X mark) Lambe
Witness Benjamin Beeson, Chris Nation, ____Procter ____?

Joseph Lamb married Frances Beeson on 7/23/1761 in Rowan County, NC.

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2004
Name: Joseph Lamb
Gender: Male
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1738
Spouse Name: Frances Beeson
Spouse
Birth Place: NC
Spouse Birth Year: 1744
Marriage
Year: 1761
Marriage State: NC
Number Pages: 1
_____________________________________
Name: Frances Beeson
Gender: Female
Birth Place: VA
Birth Year: 1744
Spouse Name: Joseph Lamb
Spouse
Birth Place: VA
Spouse Birth Year: 1738
Marriage
Year: 1761
Marriage State: NC
Number Pages: 1


Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy North Carolina Yearly Meeting, Vol. I, New Garden MM Mins. and Marriages
Marriages Lamb 1757, 9, 29. Robert, Roan C. m Rachel Taylor
1760, 11, 29. Henry rocf Perquimanns MM, N.C., dated 1760, 10, 5
1760, 11, 29. Joseph and Jacob rocf Perquimanns MM, N.C., dated 1760, 6, 4
1760, 11, 29. Thomas rocf Perquimanns MM, N.C., dated 1760, 10, 1
1761, 6, 7. Elizabeth, dt Henry, Roan Co., m Samuel Ozburn
1761, 7, 9. Bertha, dt Henry, Roan Co., m Benjamin Beeson
1761, 7, 23. Joseph, s Henry, Roan Co., m Frances Beeson
1762, 9, 25. Cert rec for Frederick from Fairfax MM, in Monockasee, VA, dated 1758, 3, 25, but he never appeared
1764, 6, 14. Jacob, Centre, Roan Co., s Henry, m Sarah Stone
1765, 12, 28. Reuben and w gtc Welses MM, this province
1767, 10, 7. Joshua, s Thomas, Centre, Roan Co., m Miriam Powel
1778, 5, 30. Samuel & w rocf Center MM, N.C., dated 1778, 4, 18


Family Data Collection - Individual Records, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2000
Name: Joseph Lamb
Spouse: Frances Beeson
Parents: Henry Lamb
Birth Place: Nansemond Co, VA
Birth Date: 1736
Marriage Place: New Garden, Guilford Co
Marriage Date: 23 Jul 1761
Death Place: Randolph Co
Death Date: 1820
_____________________________________
Name: Frances Beeson
Spouse: Joseph Lamb
Parents: Benjamin Beeson, Elizabeth Hunter
Birth Place: Frdrck, Hopewell, VA
Birth Date: 10 Dec 1744
Marriage Date: 23 Jul 1761


Frances Beeson was born 12/10/1744to Benjamin Beeson, Sr. and Elizabeth Hunter. She is listed in her father's will.
I Benjamin Beeson of Randolph county and State of North Carolina being advanced to old age and calling to mind that it is appointed for all men once to die and now being in but a poor state of health but of a sound mind and memory thanks to the auther of all good for same, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following, that is to say first all of my just Debts and funeral charges to be paid by my Executors hereafter to be named.

First I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Elizabeth all my Personal Estate Except the Cash notes during her widowhood, the house she now lives in, the barn and Building with one half orchard and five or Six poles Round the Dwelling home to make her a garden with wood and wather or as much as she Shall think best. Twenty five Bushels of bread stuff one fat hogg every year During her widowhood and four or five of cleared land when she Shall think best if she needs so much bread paid by my son Edward Beeson.
2nd at the end of her widowhood to be Equally Divided Amongst my five sons Isaac, William, Richard, Edward and Benjamin.

3rd and lastly at the end of my wifes widowhood all the Rest of my Movable Estate to be Equally divided amongst all my children that is living (to wit) Isaac, Benjamin, William, Richard, Edward, Frances, Ann, Charity, Betty, Mary. I do Constitute and Ordain my two sons Isaac and Edward Beeson Executors of this my last will and testament and revoke all others heretofore by me made.

Signed Sealed and Delivered in the presents of us this 2nd day of the 4th Month 1794.
Benjamin (B) Beeson (seal) his mark
Witnesses: William Beeson, Henry Lamb, Benjamin Lamb


North Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890
Name: Joseph Lamb
State: NC
County: Rowan County
Township: Early Tax List
Year: 1768
Database: NC Early Census Index


Guilford County, NC Deed Book
P. 229, 15 November 1773, John Nation of Guilford, planter, and Elizabeth his wife to Joseph Lamb of same, planter, one hundred twenty pounds, 174 1/2 acres, on Pole Catt Cr., begin at 2 black oaks the cor. of Henry Lamb, N 10 ch. to a black oak, W cross creek 34 ch. to a post, S 45 ch. to a white oak, E 40 ch. to a black oak saplin, N 35 ch. to a hicory, W 6 ch. to first station, Granville to John Nation, John Nation to Christopher Nation, Christopher Nation to John Nation Junr. 8 June 1769, registered in Rowan; signed: Jno. (I) Nation; witness: Isaac Beeson, Jacob Elliott; proved May 1774 Term by affirmation of Beeson.

North Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1790-1890
Name: Joseph Lamb
State: NC
County: Randolph County
Township: No Township Listed
Year: 1779
Database: NC Early Census Index




1790 U.S. Census of Randolph County, North Carolina; Series: M637; Roll: 7; Page: 279; Image: 165; Family History Library Film: 056814, "Joseph Lamb"
Name: Joseph Lamb
Home in 1790 (City, County, State): Randolph, North Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - Under 16: 3
Free White Persons - Males - 16 and over: 2
Free White Persons - Females: 2
Number of Household Members: 7
Joseph Lamb
John Lewis
John Lewis
Benjamin Lamb
Nathan Lamb
William Lamb
John Morris
Stephen McCollum
Joseph Macey
Samuel Mattuck
Elisha Mendenhall
Christian Morriss
Ezekiel Morgan
Christopher Nashon
Samuel Osborn
Matthew Osborn
David Osborn
William Osborn




1800 U.S. Census of Hillsboro, Randolph County, North Carolina; Roll: 32; Page: 328; Image: 334; Family History Library Film: 337908, "Joseph Lamb"
Name: Joseph Lamb
Home in 1800 (City, County, State): Hillsboro, Randolph, North Carolina
Free White Persons - Males -10 thru 15: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 45 and over: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 15: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 45 and over: 1
Number of Household Members Under 16: 3
Number of Household Members Over 25: 2
Number of Household Members: 6

Reuben Lamb Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Reuben Lamb Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
John Love Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
John Laethem Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
James Lambert Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
John Lewis Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Josiah Lyndon Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
George Lucas Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Edmond Luck Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
John Laughlin Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
John Laethem Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Henry Lamb Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Henry Lamb Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Joseph Lamb Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
John Lee Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Pete Laurance Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
James Moffett Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Jacob Moser Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Stephen Mccollum Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Benjamin Marshall Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Allen Marshall Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Pudy Mcgowen Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
William Mcgowen Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
John Magram Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina
Cathy Masley Hillsboro Randolph North Carolina




1810 U.S. Census of Randolph County, North Carolina; Roll: 38; Image: 0337911; Family History Library Film: 00322, "Joseph Lamb"
Name: Joseph Lamb
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Randolph, North Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 15: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 45 and over: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 10: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 45 and over : 1
Numbers of Slaves: 9
Number of Household Members Under 16: 2
Number of Household Members Over 25: 2
Number of Household Members: 13

Michael Luther North Carolina Randolph
James Lewis North Carolina Randolph
John M Lewis North Carolina Randolph
George Limeburg North Carolina Randolph
Wm Laugly North Carolina Randolph
John Lane North Carolina Randolph
Joseph Lane North Carolina Randolph
Ino Lane North Carolina Randolph
John Lane North Carolina Randolph
Joseph Lamb North Carolina Randolph
Allen Langly North Carolina Randolph
Isaac Lane North Carolina Randolph
John Loudermilk North Carolina Randolph
Joseph Lawley North Carolina Randolph
John Long North Carolina Randolph
Jamud Limebury North Carolina Randolph
Francis Limebury North Carolina Randolp
Jacob Limebury North Carolina Randolph
James Low North Carolina Randolph
John Lewis North Carolina Randolph
Jonathan Lewallen North Carolina Randolph
Cornelius Lamb North Carolina Randolph
Samuel Limebury North Carolina Randolph


1814 NC Census of Randolph County, NC
Name: Joseph Lamb
State: NC
County: Randolph County
Township: Second Reg. Mr
Year: 1814
Database: NC 1812-1814 Muster Rolls


They had 10 children, (I haven't verified these yet, except for Nathan Marmaduke Lamb, Sr. and Henry M. Lamb.):

1) Henry M. Lamb (DOB About 1763 in Rowan County, NC; DOD About 1837 in Surry County NC) married Ann Dennis (DOB 8/24/1762 in PA; DOD About 1850 in ? )

2) Welmet Lamb (DOB ABout 1764 in Guilford County, NC; DOD About 1820 in Wayne County, IN) married Israel B. Elliot, Sr. (DOB 7/28/1759 in York, PA; DOD 5/30/1821 in Wayne County, IN)

3) Benjamin Lamb (DOB 6/21/1766 in Perquimans County, NC; DOD 4/1845 in Randolph County, NC) married Elizabeth Jackson (DOB About 1766 in ? ; DOD 2/5/1837 in Randolph County, NC)

4) Nathan Marmaduke Lamb, Sr. (DOB 9/12/1768 in Rowan County, NC; DOD 1/1845 in Asheboro, Randolph County, NC) married Mary Dunn (DOB 1768-1770 in Cane Creek, Chatham County, NC; DOD About 1848 in Randolph County, NC)

5) Charity Lamb (DOB 12/12/1770 in Rowan County, NC; DOD About 1850 in ? ) married George Sutton (DOB ? in ? ; DOD ? in ? )

6) Caleb Lamb (DOB 4/11/1773 in NC; DOD ? in ? ) married Margaret Johnson (DOB ? in ? ; DOD ? in ? )

7) Albert Reuben Lamb (DOB 3/5/1776 in Guilford County, NC; DOD 3/1844 in ) married Rachel Newby (DOB 9/16/1779 in ? ; DOD 6/6/1870 in Hendricks County, IN)

8) Edith Lamb (DOB ? in ? ; DOD ? in ? ) married ?

9) Richard O. Lamb (DOB 11/27/1781 in Randolph County, NC; DOD 2/21/1845 in Randolph County, NC) married Ellen Jane Low (DOB About 1781 in ? ; DOD Before 1844 in Randolph County, NC)

10) Gabriel Lamb (DOB About 1783 in Perquimans County, NC; DOD About 1849 in Randolph County, NC) married Sarah Davis (DOB About 1788 in ? ; DOD After 1849 in Randolph County, NC)



Joseph Lamb died 25 November 1820; his will probated that next month, in Randolph County, North Carolina. Frances Beeson Lamb also died in 1820 before Joseph Lamb died but I'm not sure what the actual date was.

Joseph Lamb's Will:
"it is my will that my Son Richard Lamb shall have the plantation whereon we now Live with all the appurtenances thereto belonging on this side of the Creek, and my son Gabriel to have all on the west side of the Creek. It's a plantation on which he now lives, the creek is to be the line between them. It is my will that my Son Richard shall have the waggon and geers, it is my will that my sons Henry, Benjamin, and two daughters Welmet and Edith have five shillings each, and the remainder of my property to be equally divided between my other children, Benjamin, Nathan, Charity, Caleb, Albert, Richard and Gabriel. And lastly I ordain Nathan Lamb and Richard Lamb my executors to this my Last Will and testament this twenty eighth day of the twelfth month 1813, pronounced in the presence of David Reynolds, William Chamness, William Beeson, Signed Joseph Lamb."


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