..........Contact me at Mom25dogs@gmail.com.........

Contact me at Mom25dogs@gmail.com

Friday, April 12, 2013

Speech, Speech

You’ve been asked to speak at your high school alma mater — about the path of life. (Whoa.) Draft the speech.



I graduated from this high school many years ago. A lot has changed. The idea of having your own personal computer at home was inconceivable and now everyone has them and we even have mini computers as our cell phones, which also weren't invented back then. I got married and have lived a good life full of change. But one thing hasn't changed. I was born and raised in a Christian home. I became a Christian when I was 8 yrs old. During high school, I struggled with severe depression and floundered and embarrassed myself too many times. I asked questions about my faith but I never lost my belief in Jesus Christ. I re-dedicated my life to Him when I was a senior in this high school and I never looked back. He has been my one constant in my life. And when I look back and think of my ancestors, I realize He was the same for them. I have spent a lot of time working on my genealogy and have found many Christians in my family tree. God was their rock, God is my rock, and God can be your rock. When life seems to be flooding you and you feel like you are drowning, reach down with your toes and touch that Rock! He's still there. If He is your Lord and Savior, if you have been born again into eternal life, then He will be there. And, one day, when you are my age and you look back, you will realize He has always been there and brought you out to the other side. If you weren't raised in a Christian home, you can still learn the same Bible I learned; you can still learn the same hymns and praise songs that I learned; you can still learn God's Ways just I learned them. I just learned them at a younger age. If you've never been inside a church, it's not a scary place. Select one that teaches from the Bible and believes the Bible is without error. Select one where you feel comfortable and free to ask questions, a church where you can learn about God and His Ways. If one seems off to you, go to another one until you find the one that welcomes you and directs you ALWAYS towards God. Keep in mind that a church is made of people who come from all different backgrounds; are at different places in their own journey of faith; have had different experiences; were raised different ways; and, have their own weaknesses towards sin. None of us are sinless and each of us have a unique weakness towards particular sins. For me, I struggle with depression and my mouth. For someone else, they are weak in the area of alcohol. For another it may be the homosexual lifestyle. Our God still loves us and He is always forgiving of the sins we repent of. He is working on us and we are incomplete projects. So, if someone disappoints you, hurts your feelings, runs roughshod over your comfort... realize that it's the human in us, NOT the God in us. God has not disappointed you, a human being has. God has not let you down and hurt your feelings, a human being has. Try to be forgiving, try to live at peace with others but realize that God is the one and only perfect being and it is in Him we trust. We don't put a pastor on a pedestal and believe he will never let us down. God is our God, no man can be our god. Your high school friends, your best friend forever, are walking out the high school door into their own lives. Most you may never see again except at high school reunions. You think you are so tight and nothing will come between you but it will. Life happens. People get jobs and move away, get married and have children, go to college and join the military. All of these are natural life changes. You will all age, begin to lose your hair or put on weight, or both! Because it's life. In your youth and exuberance you tend to think you have forever and everything will stay the same but it won't. I pray that your first adult decision will be to ask Jesus Christ into your heart so that you will have one thing that will never change... your salvation and eternity with God in Heaven.

Thursday, April 11, 2013

This Transports Me Back To Childhood

Tell us about a sensation — a taste, a smell, a piece of music — that transports you back to childhood.


The slap of the screen door takes me back. We didn't have air conditioning until I was in junior high school. So we used fans, attic fan, open windows and the old screen door. That makes me think of summer.

The smell of honeysuckle, roses, gardenias and plum trees. I had a plum tree outside my bedroom window and would have the window open for cooling and it smelled so sweet. Again, makes me think of summer time. I could be lazy and lay in the floor of my bedroom with a bowl of popcorn, an iced tea and a stack of mystery books and read and read and read!

The taste of watermelon, a good ripe cantalope, ripe tomatoes, iced tea all make me think of summer times in my childhood.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Something I Was Attached To

Describe an item you were incredibly attached to as a child. What became of it?


I was having a hard time learning to read in the first grade. My Mother bought me a "big girl" book, Nancy Drew's The Secret Of The Old Clock. I couldn't wait to learn how to read so I could read this book! Every once and awhile I would take it out and try to read it again. Finally, in the third grade, I was able to read it all the way through. I loved it and collected a good many Nancy Drews. I still have them all. My Mother found a box full of vintage Nancy Drews when I was about 12 yrs old. They had been printed in the 1930's. I read them all and still have them. It also set up a lifelong love of books and the mystery genre.

Tuesday, April 09, 2013

What Foods Would I Choose For A Stint On A Deserted Island

You’ve being exiled to a private island, and your captors will only supply you with five foods. What do you pick?

1) Potato chips and dip/corn chips and salsa, sour cream and guacamole

2) Ribeye or Prime Rib steaks with baked potatoes

3) GoLean Kashi GoLean cereal with milk

4) Fruits of all kinds

5) Cheeses and crackers

I love food and it's hard to cut it down to just 5 but, at least with these 5 favorites I would be healthy.

Tuesday Tip - Genealogy Tips

Tuesday’s Tip is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers at Geneabloggers.com to help them post content on their sites. What advice would you give to another genealogist or family historian, especially someone just starting out? Remember when you were new to genealogy? Wasn’t it great to find tips and tricks that worked for others? Post your best tips at your genealogy blog on Tuesday’s Tip. This series was suggested by Susan Petersen of Long Lost Relatives and, in fact, this has been an ongoing series by Lynn Palermo at The Armchair Genealogist and by Miriam Robbins Midkiff at AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors.


A Real "Family Tree"!


Here are some of my tips about genealogy!

1.) First step is to contact your relatives. People usually love the attention and love to tell stories about their families (although some may still be reluctant or clam up on skeletons in the closet). If you have parents, grandparents, or be especially blessed to still have great grandparents, spend time with them and ask them questions to prod their memories. Take a notebook or recorder and jot down everything they say. Don't stop with just direct ancestors, talk to aunts/uncles, cousins, great aunts/great uncles, etc. You can ask them questions like:
Who were your grandparents? When and where were they born?

Who were your great grandparents? Did you remember them?

How did you/they meet? When and where did you/they get married?

Where did you/they live? Do you remember an address?


Where did you/they work?



What church did you/they attend?


Where are they buried? Do you remember the funeral? Are there pictures of their funeral or cemetery or church?

What school did you/they attend or even how much education did they have?

When and where were you/they born?

Did they have any old family Bible records?



Do they have any old pictures? Can you identify the people in the photos?



Do you/they have any family memorabilia?


But even ask questions like:
Did they have a favorite pet? (My great grandfather had a favorite possum hunting dog and I got a great slice-of-life story about that.)

What were your interests? What were the interests of your grandparents (We call them hobbies now but back then they were usually too busy for "hobbies" but they did have interests like reading, poetry, quilting, collecting recipes, whittling, making furniture for the house, fishing, etc) My Grandma liked poetry and kept poems that she snipped from her local newspaper. She also collected and swapped recipes and I inherited a shoebox full of them. One of my great grandfathers' had a funny fishing story.

Were there any scandals in their neighborhood, community, church? What were their reactions to those scandals? How did they feel about it?

Who were their neighbors? What kind of relationship did they have with them? Who were their friends? What did they like to do together?

Were you/they ever in the newspaper? (My Dad was in the newspaper a lot in his little farming community because of his high school and 4H activities.) Here is my uncle's notice in the newspaper about his being commissioned as a 2nd Lt. in the US Army.



What do you/they remember about school? Favorite subject, favorite teacher, favorite project, girlfriend/boyfriend, best friend, etc.


It's questions like these that prompt a lot of memories and little details begin to come out that are really neat. Not only are you learning about your family but you are flattering them with your attention and making them feel important. So it's a ministry to them as well. I don't know how many times I've said, "I never knew that!" or "I never heard that story before!" and I feel like I've learned a new puzzle piece to add to my family picture. It also brings out details that may help you in your genealogy search. For instance, my grandparents lived and died in Stanly County, NC. But I couldn't find their marriage record. Then I was asking Dad one day how they met and he told me that Papa had gone to another town to find work at a mill and had met Grandma (who had done the same) and they married in that town. That was why I couldn't find their marriage record in Stanly County.


Write it down!! Don't trust your memory. And don't wear them out with too many questions all in one day. Visit them or telephone them often and keep your notebook with you at all times to jot down new information. Even just taking them for a drive will bring back memories to them. Take them back to their home community or where they were born or by the place they worked, or to the farm and listen to the stories that it brings back. Things they thought they had forgotten.


2.) Keep your data organized. You can do it all by hand if you aren't comfortable with a computer but keep it organized. If you do use a computer, print out hard copies and keep in notebooks or files. Keep a record of your sources for each fact. For instance, if you find out their birthday from their own lips, their birth certificate, their marriage license, the 1930 census and their tombstone...then note all those sources with the birthdate. And don't just put "birth certificate" as a source. You want to make a complete note of this source like, "Birth certificate of Sarah Jones, Birth Certificate #12345, Vol II, located at Dept of Health, 123 Any St, Hometown, US" -or- "Tombstone of Sarah Jones, First Baptist Church of Hometown, 456 All St, Hometown, US, GPS N 83.789 W 45.098" -or- "Civil War record of John Jones from Civil War Records of the South, Vol V, by Jack Sprat, Published 2003 by Whoknows Co, pg 246". You want yourself, or anybody else, to be able to find the same record you found.

I keep my databases on the computer but I have also printed out hardcopies in notebooks and I keep backup records like a copy of a census page, copy of death certificate, copy of newspaper obits, copy of pages from books, etc in a file cabinet. I have a file folder for each family last name that I am researching and I put these records in these file folders. My file cabinet is stuffed but I have proof of my facts and it's organized.

Here are some manual forms.







It's also important to try and make copies on acid free paper even if it means bringing it to the library with you and asking the librarian to use your paper when you go to copy or print out or take your print out and have it copied at Kinkos (again asking them to use acid free paper or take your own and ask them to use it) or use your own printer. It's not that expensive from regular office paper. And, if you look carefully, you can find "acid free" on the packaging. If it's not on the packaging, it ain't acid free!

3) If you use a computer software program like FamilyTreemaker or RootsMagic, then make backups of your data often. And "grandfather" the backups. For instance, make a backup and name it "Smith 1 2 2009". With "1 2 2009" meaning the date of January 2, 2009. I recommend you backup every hour if you are really putting in some time on the same day. So the next time you make a backup up, on the same day, you would name it "Smith 1 2 2009 II" meaning the date of January 2, 2009 backup #2; or "Smith 1 2 2009 4pm" meaning the date of January 2, 2009 4pm. Once you've grandfathered a sufficient number of backups, you can start deleting older backup copies to free up your hard drive space. But, believe me! From personal experience (more than once)! Make backups and grandfather them! I've suddenly had corrupted databases that I didn't know anything about and I deligently backed up. But that just copied the corrupted database over the good backup. So I lost the database and the backup. If I had grandfathered the backups I could have gone back to an earlier backup and at least saved the bulk of my work and only lost the most recent data. Both programs have done me this way and it's meant total reconstruction and inputting all the info in again! Since I have thousands of names and sources and data, it was enough to make you cry. At least I had my notebooks and backup printed records in my file cabinets.

Another tip for computer software users is to divide your families into their own files. The first time I started a database I started with myself as the primary person and began to work back on my husband and my family in just one database. So, the first time that the database got corrupted, I lost everything in my family and his. So when I reconstructed I created 4 databases...1 for my mother's side of the family, 1 for dad's, 1 for mother-in-law and 1 for father-in-law. When one of those 4 became corrupted (the 2nd time) I only lost one of the databases and not everything! But this time I have constructed 8 databases with 1 for maternal grandmother, 1 for maternal grandfather, 1 for paternal grandmother, 1 for paternal.... You see, what I mean? Sure enough, just last month one of the 8 databases got corrupted and I lost that database. But I still had the other 7 and I had grandfathered my backups and was able to reconstruct by going back and picking up one of the uncorrupted backups. I lost a couple of days work but not the whole thing. I was able to bring it back up to date using my records in my filing cabinet so I was back up to speed within hours instead of having lost everything! And for the first time, I didn't cry!

Me in a small town courthouse looking up marriage records.


4) If you live close to a good library, go to your library and ask for help on genealogy. If your town is of any size, then you probably have a very good genealogy dept. They will have records on microfilm, computer, books, etc. And, my experience has shown that the librarians are very kind and try to be helpful. If they work in that genealogy room, then they are very knowledgeable and you can trust they know what they are talking about. Even if you live in CA but your family was from SC, your librarian can help educate you in how to do research. For instance, do you know how to find a birth certificate, a census record, a death certificate, a newspaper obituary, a Civil War record, a cemetery record, a Revolutionary War pension record, a will abstract, a deed? I didn't! But the librarian can tell you the resources available, how to find records, how to use microfilm or the computer, etc. Call the librarian in the hometown you are researching and ask them what kind of local records they have, who you need to contact for a birth certificate, is there a website for a cemetery survey of such and such cemetery, etc. Appreciate your librarians, treat them well and cultivate a relationship with them because they are wonderful helps and resources. I try to follow the rules (like signing in when I enter the genealogy room, signing in for the computer, keep my cell phone on vibrate, don't talk loud, etc) and I try to be friendly and courteous and not monopolize their time. This has opened up their wide range of experience and knowledge to me. They have been wonderful helps and have been willing to go out of their way to help me when questions arise! Be sure to thank them and be on the lookout for someway that to help them. For instance, I found a photo on ebay of a local event back at the turn of the century. I knew this would interest my librarians so I forwarded it to them and the library was able to purchase it and it's now framed in our genealogy room. Just a little networking like that benefits both sides. They have helped me so much and I was tickled to be able to help them.

5) Join local genealogical societies. By local, I mean local to your families' hometowns. For instance, I live in SC but I'm a lifetime member of the Davidson Cty, NC Genealogical Society because my grandma's family lived there for generations. I joined for a year and found out how active this group was and found their newsletters were great resources so when it came time to renew, I joined for a lifetime. It's been worth it! I have joined some that haven't been that active or contributed much to the communities knowledge so I didn't renew my membership. But, keep in mind, that may change in the future. New blood comes in, new officers are elected, new ideas surface, new work is done and the genealogical society grows up and you may want to re-join. Your local libraries (again, local to the hometown you are researching) should also have back copies of local genealogical society publications which contain valuable info. Also join historical groups like the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) or the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC), Sons of the American Revolution (SAR), Colonial Dames, Mayflower Descendants, etc. You may or may not have a very active chapter in your area. If you do, then it's a great resource and you learn at every meeting. If you don't, then try another chapter or wait awhile and go back and see if it's grown and changed.

6) If your library doesn't have free access to Ancestry.com/Rootsweb.com/HeritageQuest.com or you don't have time to spend at the library using their free access, then get an annual membership if you possibly can (one of the 3). These are invaluable!! You not only get access to records but access to other researchers and their published databases and you might find a distant cousin has some additional information that you didn't have. I've met many a "cousin" online and appreciated their additional information. Always remember that there can be mistakes. Due to typos, illegibility on tombstones or records, wrong assumptions, honest mistakes...their data could be wrong or incomplete but it can give you valuable data and leads.

7) Learn to do Google searches (browser searches). That's right! Type in an ancestor's name, a cemetery's name, a place of work name, a church name and you might find a treasure trove. For instance, last week I was looking for a church address so I could go to the cemetery and find an ancestor. I did a Google search and the church had a website that even included a cemetery survey (bless their wonderful hearts!) which saved me a trip. I have also found cemetery surveys by doing Google searches on the cemetery names. I've found "cousins" that had published their family research and gave me additional information (God bless them). I've found local genealogy websites that have tons of information about the area that I'm researching. By doing Google searches for images, I've found old photos of cotton mills where my ancestors worked, photos of mill villages where they lived, etc. I Google everyday on something. So if you have a computer and are on the Internet, learn how to use Google.

8) When you are using the computer for Ancestry.com, etc then learn how to search using different spellings. For instance one of my family lines is "Reese". So when I'm searching Ancestry.com's 1930 Census records for "William Reese", I have to remember to try different name spellings. Remember census takers back then usually had to spell according to how it sounded to them. So here are the variations I would use to try and find the 1930 census record for "William Wilford Reese":
"William Reese"
"Wilford Reese"
"Wm Reese"
"Bill Reese"
"W.W. Reese"
"Willie Reese"
"Will Reese"
"W. Reese"
"William Reece"
"Wm Reece", etc
And all the variations with Reas, Rease, Reis, Rhys, Rees, Reise, etc.

Another personal example is the name Cohen. Here are the variations I found of that name:
Coan
Cohan
Cowan
Kohen
Koan
Cone
Kone
Blah, blah, blah
Come to find out this line is not Jewish "Cohen" but the Irish "Cowan".

And don't forget first names like "Elizabeth" have many variations:
Elise
Elisa
Liza
Liz
Lisa
Beth
Bethey
Betty
Betsy
Bett
Bette
Bet
Betta
Eliza
Ellie
Elly
Elise
Elissa
Lizbet
Lilibet
Bess
Ella
Ellen
Elsa
Elsie
Ilsa
Lizzy
Lizzie
Lysa
Lysette
Lissa
Lissy
Libby
Lilly
Lila
Lilla
Lillah
Bizzy
Buffy
Elza
Tess
Tibby
Tizzy


And, then there are the typos or illegible handwriting to take into consideration. For instance, whoever entered the records for the 1930's census for Ancestry.com may have just made data entry typo or they were unable to read the illegible handwriting of the original census taker and entered the data incorrectly. The handwriting of the census takers could be very neat or slopppy or have their own characteristics so that their "H" looks much like a "W", etc.

If you try every variation you can think of and still can't find the census record, then try other members of the family. For instance, John Doe is married to Jane and has John Jr., William, Mary, and Cansada Doe. You can't find John Doe in the 1880 Census even after all your variation searches. So start looking for "Jane Doe". If that doesn't work look for "Cansada Doe". Now why would I start looking for "Cansada Doe" instead of "John Jr.", "William" or "Mary" Doe? Because a) you've already looked for a John Doe and couldn't find him so looking for John Jr. Is going to be fruitless too, and b) William and Mary are very common names and may take up your time looking at lists and lists of "William Doe"'s to find your family but "Cansada" is a little more rare and you should have a shorter list and save you time. Also remember that girls usually married so if you know their married name, look for them in that 1880 census because old John and Jane may be living with their married daughter. I had this happen with Susan Ann Quinn Cohen. I couldn't find a Susan Cohen to save my life. Come to find out she had remarried after her husband died. Her 2nd husband had died and she spent her last days with her married daughter. If I hadn't looked for that married daughter's family and found a "Susan FOWLER" living with them in the 1930 census with the relationship of "mother-in-law" I would never have found her.

Also, if you find the home of one of the family members, then scan the previous 2 pages of the census or the next 2 pages of the census. Many families lived close together and you can put it together that way.

9) Try to learn some of the history of the hometown area. For instance my hometown area was big into cotton mills and mill villages and this played a big role in some of the famly lines I am researching that lived in my hometown. Another county that my grandma's family lived in had a railroad through it that had a stop in the main town which was also the county seat. There was a newspaper story of how one of my ancestors was killed by a train. He had gone to town and his horse was on it's own heading back home while he took a nap in the back of the wagon. The train hit the wagon and killed him. Another county in my researches had a flood disaster that affected my family line. Another county in my family research is Madison County, NC where they had the Shelton-Laurel Massacre during the Civil War. There was a lot of Rebel and Unionist feuding going on up there. What I learned about the history of the county during the Civil War backed up the passed down stories in my family and I was able to place them in the middle of all that! (Remember the movie Cold Mountain? That's the area!)

10) If you possibly can, visit the area personally. Make a list of the places you want to find. I go cemetery hunting. Here I am in a tiny mountain cemetery taking notes.

I also look for family homeplaces, farms, churches they attended, mills they worked in, etc. This is where the Internet maps help you. If you can find the address with a Google search then you can map it and get directions using Yahoomaps. You can also use a GPS device. Take photos and videos.

Here are tips for visiting the area:
A) Be sure you have addresses and directions. Or, at least, know the general area. I have gone to an area and simply driven the roads to look for cemeteries and gotten out and looked for family names. I have found nuggets of treasure that way. But it's best if you have addresses. So make a list of all the places you want to find.

B) DON'T GO ALONE. Be sure your family knows where you are going and when to expect you home and DON'T GO ALONE. Take your fully charged cell phone and DON'T GO ALONE. For instance, you could sprain an ankle walking in a remote cemetery and not be able to make it back to your car. I'm allergic to bee stings and fire ant bites and need to get medical attention so I don't need to be alone if that happens. I have hypoglycemia and could faint and die if a sugar attack happens when I'm alone. I could get lost and wander around if I don't have a GPS or cell phone. I could be attacked in a lonely cemetery if I'm alone. And, believe me, I've been on mountaintops in the brushes and weeds trying to find old family cemeteries! I could have an accident and be missing and no one know where I am, especially in unchartered territory. So I don't go alone!!! And I might suggest you take physical protection. I'll leave it up to you to discern what I mean.

C) Things to take when you go on these field trips:
Take your cell phone, digital camera, video camera, laptop, GPS, extra batteries.

Take some food and drink so you can picnic if you are walking a cemetery and it gets to be lunchtime.

Take large pieces of chalk so you can brush it over tombstones that are almost illegible with age.

This really works to bring out the writing.

Take a spiral notebook to jot down your notes.

Wear comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes (don't wear sandals). Dress in layers in case it's cool in the morning but heats up in the afternoon. Take a hat and sunglasses.

If you are staying a few days, stop at local places that look like they may be regular haunts to locals like a hometown diner or church, etc. And be friendly and talk to people. Tell them you are in town doing some family research on the "Millers" and see if they know any "Millers" who are still alive or where the "Miller" family cemetery is, etc. Drop by the local library and see what they have and introduce yourself to the librarians. Be sensitive and don't monopolize their time if they are busy but you'd be surprised who will take a few minutes to talk to you and give you valuable information. I've met people who were walking the cemetery at the same time and they stopped and, come to find out, we were distant cousins looking for the same people. I've met people working in the genealogy room at the same time and we strike a conversation and find out we are searching the same line and can share.

11) Be willing to share. I cannot tell you how many people have shared their research with me and how much it has helped! So I try to always be willing to share my research with others. With email I can email someone a photo. I'm trying to put stuff on my website/blog so that I can just email a link to someone who contacts me about info. That way I'm not having to re-type stuff over and over again. None of this costs me anything but time.

Monday, April 08, 2013

Motivation Monday - How To Get Motivated In Genealogy

As a child, I got a children's portable typewriter one year for Christmas. I immediately went around to all my family at the family Christmas party and tediously asked them their full name and birth dates. Then I typed the list up for them. I was so proud of myself.

That should have been a clue that one day, I would become a genealogist! I've always been an organized, detail oriented person. I didn't show much interest, of course, growing up. Children and teenagers are notoriously self centered. But I had an aunt that was doing genealogy. On a visit, after I had been married a couple of years, she gave us all photographs of some of our ancestors. I wrote what she told us on the back of the photographs. And for some reason my interest was kindled. After that I would write her asking some questions. I attended a family reunion and met a cousin of my Dad's who had written a book on their line which I purchased. That was on my father's side. On my mother's side, she had subscribed to some genealogy newsletters about her paternal line. I found a box full of these and it got me going in that direction.

Of course, I was totally at a loss on how to do it. Other than cemeteries, I didn't know how to do genealogical research. But one day I went to the library and the ladies in the genealogy room showed me how to use the microfiche machines, the copier and how to locate the censuses. Other than their help, I had no formal training. I was pretty much feeling my way around. I wandered around the books and I asked them for help and then came Ancestry.com. The ladies taught me how to use the library version of Ancestry.com and HeritageQuest. For the first few years I just went to the library to work. I would take my lunch and my laptop and work all day. Finally, a few years ago, I realized I could pay for my own subscription and do all this research at home. Another watershed moment! I have not regretted it! It's been well worth it. I have an adjustable bed, a laptop and laptop table. Everything is on my laptop (with multiple backups on external hard drives) and stored digitally... copies of source records, photos, cemetery photos, ancestor photos, etc.

I've learned so much over the years I've been doing it and I'm very thankful for the ladies at the library and people who have shared their info on the Internet or by email or on their website and blogs. I've learned from them. Of course, with any ancestor data, I try to get sources for the information because I've seen websites with discrepancies, errors, typos, honest mistakes. But it can give you a clue and a lot of it is good and the best ones have sources for their information. But there are also people who have given their time and expertise to make videos on Youtube, blog posts, podcasts, etc. It's a college education in genealogy online,  in your home and for free! I appreciate that. Anyone who shares a tip, a how-to, their own research on a line, some motivation, a different way to look at something, a new way to organize or research, an interesting story... those are gems that just may help someone else and they do it for no other reason than to help someone else. If you have a chance to pay back, I hope you will. I have. I use my blog to post, I've taken videos of churches and cemeteries to post on Youtube for others. I've had comments on my videos thanking me because they had family there and lived too far away to visit it themselves. I've added graves to Findagrave.com. Just a few ways you can give back.

Amanuensis Monday - William Peter Boone and Mary Jane Smith

William Peter Boone (aka Peter William Boone) was born 5/20/1834 in Alamance County, NC to Andrew Boone (DOB 8/8/1802 in Guilford County, NC; DOD About 1880 in Piney Creek, Alleghany County, NC) and Jane Hobbs (DOB 1/18/1806 in Orange County, NC; DOD ? in ? ).



1850 U.S. Census of Southern District, Sampson County, North Carolina ; Roll : M432_644 ; Page : 437A ; Image : 420 , Lines 11-25 under Michael Cannaly (sic, Michael Connolly) with "William Boon" on Line 24
Michael C. Cannaly (sic, Michael Connolly), 43 yrs old, M(ale), W(hite), O.S.F. (?), $4,000 Real Estate Value, Born in NC
Nancy Cannaly, 36 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Mary Cannaly, 30 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Ann Cannaly, 12 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Virginia Cannaly, 11 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Mary Cannaly, 10 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Francis Cannaly, 8 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Sarah Cannaly, 6 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Catherine Cannaly, 4 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Alexander Cannaly, 3 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
Malcombe Cannaly, 1 yrs old, F, W, Born in NC
S. Boon, 25 yrs old (DOB 1825), M(ale), W(hite), Overseer, Born in NC, Cannot read or write
Grice Boon, 19 yrs old (DOB 1831), M, W, School student, Born in NC, Attends school
*William Boon, 16 yrs old (DOB 1834), M, W, School student, Born in NC, Attends school
Sellers Boon, 10 yrs old (DOB 1840), M, W, Born in NC, Attends school
Ann Cannaly, 80 yrs old, F, W, Born in Scotland


Peter William Boon married Mary Jane Smith on 11/12/1857 in ? when he was 23 yrs old and she was 19 yrs old. I was not able to find them in the 1860 U.S. Census. Four years after their marriage the War of Northern Aggression started. He would have been 27 yrs old but I could find no verifiable record of his service. Family story had it that he hid under the house to avoid service. I have no way to verify that either. It's also possible that he served awhile but came back home (deserted?). Until I can find service records it's all unknown. If anyone knows any further information about his service or non-service during the War, please contact me at Mom25dogs@gmail.com.

William Peter Boon and Mary Jane Smith had 11-13 children:

1) Even Alexander Boone (DOB 9/24/1858 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 5/13/1930 in Stanly County, NC) married Martha Jane Austin (DOB 1860-1867 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 10/31/1928 in Big Lick, Stanly County, NC). They had Dora A. Boone McLester, Jonah Alexander Boone, Bessie Boone, Lessie Jane Boone Hinson, Lee Quince Boone, Hettie Lecty Boone Kennedy.

2) Sarah Jane Boone (DOB 4/24/1860 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 5/30/1926 in Stanly County, NC) married William A. Hatley (DOB 10/26/1863 in NC; DOD 5/29/1906 in ? ). They had 2 children that I'm aware of: Marshall Alton Hatley and Raner Isabelle Hatley Austin.

3) Erin A. Boone (DOB About 1861 in Stanly County, NC; DOD ? in ? ) married ? . I found no record of this child so it may be that this is the same as Even Alexander Boone.

4) Pinckney Lindsay Boone (aka Pink Boone) (DOB 2/28/1862 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 4/1/1963 in Stanly County, NC) married Ida Abigail Aldridge (DOB 4/4/1866 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 2/17/1940 in Stanly County, NC). They had 6 children: Jasper Clio Boone Sr., Jener Etta Boone, Vander Boone, Roxie Ila Boone Huneycutt, Rory J. Boone, Octa Ora Boone Burgess

5) Martha Elizabeth Boone (DOB 10/24/1863 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 10/30/1887 in Stanly County, NC) married George E. Smith (DOB About 1861 in NC; DOD ? in ? ). No known children.

6) Mary Catherine Boone (aka Kate Boone) (DOB 9/7/1867 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 5/29/1950 in Stanly County, NC) married William Cornelius Burleson (aka Neal Burleson) (DOB 8/3/1868 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 1/10/1935 in Stanly County, NC). They had 10 children: Arthur Burleson, John Quincy Burleson, Jonah Richard Burleyson, Cromer F. Burleson, Annie Belle Burleson Carrier, Macon Alexander Burleson, Bertie Mae Burleson, Luther Martin Burleson, Ida Victoria Burleyson Belt, Claude Flay Burleson.

7) John Franklin Boone, Sr. (DOB 9/19/1867 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 7/7/1904 in Stanly County, NC) married Mollie Eliza Aldridge (DOB 2/6/1877 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 6/14/1945 in Stanly County, NC). They had 4 children: Virgil William Boone, Mary Ethel Boone Smart, Arlene Boone, John Franklin Boone, Jr.

8) Rebecca Louise Boone (DOB 3/1/1868 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 5/27/1957 in Stanly County, NC) married Masirah Avery Whitley (DOB 7/5/1868 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 6/2/1936 in Stanly County, NC). They had 9 children: Wade Avery Whitley Sr., Camillie Whitley Little, Lessie Carrier Whitley Morris, Rose Estella Whitley Burris, Lillie Mae Whitley Little, Lectie A. Whitley Curlee, Sarah Catherine Whitley Smith, Martin Benjamin Whitley, Martha Whitley.

9) Mary Boone (DOB About 1868 in Stanly County, NC; DOD ? in ? ) married ? . I couldn't find any records on her so this is probably actually Mary Catherine Boone?

10) Eva Malinda Boone (DOB 3/15/1873 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 2/19/1939 in Stanly County, NC) married William Eli Huneycutt (DOB 7/25/1876 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 12/20/1948 in Stanly County, NC). They had 6 children: Oscar Alexander Huneycutt, Clara May Huneycutt, Allie Huneycutt Hinson, Dallie Huneycutt McIntyre, Grover Cleveland Huneycutt, Vernia Mae Huneycutt.

11) William E. Boone (DOB 6/14/1877 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 4/17/1905 in Stanly County, NC) married Martha E. Unknown (DOB 5/1881 in NC; DOD ? in ? ). No known children.

12) George Henry Boone (DOB 10/18/1878 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 12/10/1959 in Stanly County, NC) married Lila W. Farmer (DOB 3/26/1881 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 1/24/1957 in Stanly County, NC). They had 5 children: Charlie Black Boone, Travis George Boone Sr., Arthur Jennings Boone, Jervis Boone, Thomas Alexander Boone.

13) Julia Adaline Boone (DOB 5/7/1881 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 12/29/1972 in Stanly County, NC) married Adam Houston Farmer (DOB 1/23/1875 in Stanly County, NC; DOD 12/17/1953 in Stanly County, NC). They had 9 children: Joseph Arnold Farmer, Walter Black Farmer (or Walter Brantson Farmer), Hurley Jerome Farmer, Johnsie Mae Farmer, Nealie Farmer (sic, ?), Julia Elizabeth Farmer, Virginia Dair Farmer, Dorothy Beatrice Farmer, Lila Doris Farmer.




1870 U.S. Census of Albemarle, Big Lick, Stanly County, North Carolina ; Roll : M593_1160 ; Page : 36B ; Image : 82 ; Family History Library Film : 552659 , Taken 6/28/1870 , Lines 22-30, "William Boon"
William Boon, 34 yrs old (DOB 1836), M(ale), W(hite), Farmer, $50 Real Estate Value, $125 Personal Estate Value, Born in NC, Cannot read or write
Mary Boon, 34 yrs old (DOB 1836), F, W, Keeping House, Born in NC, Cannot read or write
Alexander Boon, 10 yrs old (DOB 1860), M, W, Born in NC
Sarah J. Boon, 9 yrs old (DOB 1861), F, W, Born in NC
Pink Boon, 7 yrs old (DOB 1863), M, W, Born in NC
Elizabeth Boon, 6 yrs old (DOB 1864), F, W, Born in NC
Catherine Boon, 4 yrs old (DOB 1866), F, W, Born in NC
Franklin Boon, 3 yrs old (DOB 1867), M, W, Born in NC
Rebecca Boon, 1 yrs old (DOB 1869), F, W, Born in NC



1880 U.S. Census of Big Lick, Stanly County, North Carolina ; Roll : 982 ; Family History Film : 1254982 ; Page : 318A ; Enumeration District : 206 ; Image : 0310 , Taken 6/12/1880 , Lines 19-30, "P. William Boone"
P. William Boone, W(hite), M(ale), 48 yrs old (DOB 1832), Head, Married, Farmer, "Maimed, Crippled, Bedridden or otherwise Disabled", Cannot read or write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Mary Boone, W, F, 47 yrs old (DOB 1833), Wife, Married, Keeping House, Cannot read or write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
A. Evan Boone, W, M, 21 yrs old (DOB 1859), Son, Single, Farm Laborer, Cannot read or write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Sarah Boone, W, F, 20 yrs old (DOB 1860), Daughter, Single, Farm Laborer, Cannot read or write, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Pinkney Boone, W, M, 17 yrs old (DOB 1863), Son, Single, Farm Laborer, Attends school, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Elizabeth Boone, W, F, 15 yrs old (DOB 1865), Daughter, Single, At Home, Attends school, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Chatherine Boone (sic), W, F, 14 yrs old (DOB 1866), Daughter, Single, At Home, Attends school, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
John Boone, W, M, 12 yrs old (DOB 1868), Son, Single, At Home, Attends school, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Rebecca Boone, W, M, 10 yrs old (DOB 1870), Daughter, Single, At Home, Attends school, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Melinda Boone, W, F, 8 yrs old (DOB 1872), Daughter, At Home, Attends school, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Willie Boone, W, M, 6 yrs old (DOB 1874), Son, At Home, Attends school, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
H. George Boone, w, M, 2 yrs old (DOB 1878), Son, At Home, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC



1900 U.S. Census of Tyson, Stanly County, North Carolina ; Roll : 1218 ; Page : 10A ; Enumeration District : 0128 ; FHL microfilm : 1241218 , Taken 6/26/1900, Lines 46-49, "William Boon"
William Boon, Head, W(hite), M(ale), Born May, 1834, 62 yrs old, Married 44 yrs (DOM 1856), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer, Rents farm
Mary J. Boon, Wife, W, F, Born May, 1843, 57 yrs old, Married 44 yrs, 14 children with 11 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Henry F. Boon (sic), Son, W, M, Born April, 1880, Single, Farm Laborer, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
July A. Boon (sic), Daughter, F, W, Born (illegible), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
next page
William E. Boon, Head, M, W, Born June, 1877, 22 yrs old, Married 0 yrs, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer, Rents farm
Martha E. Boon, Wife, F, W, Born May, 1881, 19 yrs old, Married 0 yrs, 0 children, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC



1910 U.S. Census of Rocky River Springs Road, Big Lick, Stanly County, North Carolina ; Roll : T624_1125 ; Page : 6B ; Enumeration District : 0119 ; Image : ; FHL microfilm : 1375138 , Lines 91-100, "Mariah A. Whitley" (sic, Masirah A. Whitley)
Mariah A. Whitley, Head, M(ale), W(hite), 41 yrs old (DOB 1869), 1st marriage, Married 20 yrs (DOM 1890), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farmer of general farm, Can read and write, Owns farm free of mortgage
Rebecca L. Whitley, Wife, F, W, 41 yrs old (DOB 1869), 1st marriage, Married 20 yrs, 8 children with 8 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer on home farm, Can read and write
Waite A. Whitley, Son, M, W, 19 yrs old (DOB 1891), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer on home farm, Attends school, can read and write
Camillie Whitley (sic), Daughter, F, W, 18 yrs old (DOB 1892), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer on home farm, Attends school, Can read and write
Lessie M. Whitley, Daughter, F, W, 15 yrs old (DOB 1895), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer on home farm, Attends school, Can read and write
Rosie E. Whitley, Daughter, F, W, 13 yrs old (DOB 1897), Single, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer on home farm, Attends school, Can read and write
Lillie M. Whitley, Daughter, F, W, 10 yrs old (DOB 1900), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Farm laborer on home farm, Attends school
Leelie Whitley, Daughter, F, W, 8 yrs old, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Attends school
Sarah C. Whitley, Daughter, F, W, 6 yrs old (DOB 1904), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Martin B. Whitley, Son, M, W, 4 yrs old (DOB 1906), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC
Willim Boone (sic, William Peter Boone), Head, M(ale), W(hite), 75 yrs old (DOB 1835), 1st marriage, Married 52 yrs (DOM 1858), Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Chairmaker in own shop, Cannot read or write, Rents home
Mary J. Boone, Wife, F, W, 74 yrs old (DOB 1836), 1st marriage, Married 52 yrs, 14 children with 8 still living, Born in NC, Both parents born in NC, Cannot read or write

Peter William Boone died 7/27/1911 in Stanly County, NC at the age of 77 yrs old and he is buried at Smith Grove Primitive Baptist Church (now known as Smith Grove Community Cemetery), Highway 138 at Old School Road, Oakboro, Stanly County, NC.

Mary Jane Smith Boone died 1/10/1915 in Stanly County, NC at the age of 75 yrs old and she is buried with her husband at Smith Grove Primitive Baptist Church.


NC Death Certificate #78, Registration District #487031, File #10, Mary Boone (sic), DOD 1/10/1915 in Big Lick, Stanly County, NC
Female, White, Widowed, DOB 5/3/1839 (sic) in Stanly County, NC, 75 yrs, 8 mos, 7 days old
Father: Joseph Smith, born in Montgomery County, NC
Mother: (blank) Gilbert, born in Montgomery County, NC
Informant: M.A. Whitley, Big Lick, NC (son-in-law, married to her daughter, Rebecca Louise Boone Whitley)
DOD 1/10/1915 at 1pm
Cause of death: "old age & heart trouble"
Burial: 1/11/1915 in (blank)


FindAGrave.com
William P. Boon
Birth: May 20, 1834
Death: Jul. 27, 1911
Family links:
Spouse:   Mary Boon (1838 - 1915)
Burial: Smith Grove Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Oakboro, Stanly County, North Carolina, USA
Created by: TMcManaway
Record added: Sep 11, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 96885106

FindAGrave.com
Mary Boon
Birth: May 3, 1838
Death: Jan. 10, 1915
Family links:
Spouse:   William P. Boon (1834 - 1911)*
Inscription: Aged 76 Yrs. 8 Mns. & 7 Dys.
Burial: Smith Grove Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Oakboro, Stanly County, North Carolina, USA
Created by: TMcManaway
Record added: Sep 11, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 96885012

Death Records for their children and spouses:

NC Death Certificate #450, Registration District #847031, Certificate #14, Ellen Alexandera Boone (sic, Even Alexander Boone), DOD 5/13/1930 in Big Lick, Stanly County, NC
Male, White, Married to Jane Austin Boone, DOB 9/4/1859 in Stanly County, NC, 70 yrs 7 mos 9 days old
Occupation: Farmer
Father: William Boone, born in Allegheny County, NC
Mother: Mary Jane Smith, born in Stanly County, NC
Informant: F.E. Hartzell, Oakboro, NC
DOD 5/13/1930 at 9pm
Cause of death: Bright's disease
Burial: 5/15/1930 in Mineral Springs


NC Death Certificate #149, Registration District #84-7031, Register #19, Jane Boone (sic), DOD 10/31/1928 in Big Lick, Stanly County, NC
Female, White, Married to E.A. Boone, DOB "Unknown", Approximately 65 yrs old (DOB 1860) in Stanly County, NC
Father: Riley Austin, born in Union County, NC
Mother: Elizabeth Thomas, born in Union County, NC
Informant: L.E.C. Coble, Oakboro, NC
DOD 10/31/1928
Cause of death: "no attending physician supposed heart disease cause of death"
Burial: 10/31/1928 in Mineral Springs

I couldn't find any death records on Sarah Jane Boone other than her tombstone.


NC Death Certificate #14067, Registration District #84-00, Registrar's Certificate #79, Pink Linzie Boone (sic), DOD 4/1/1963 in Oakboro, Stanly County, NC (at home)
Male, White, Widowed, Spouse had been Abigail Aldridge Boone, DOB 2/29/1862 in Stanly County, NC, 101 yrs old
Occupation: Retired farmer
Father: William Boone, Mother: Mary Boone, Informant: Mrs. Lee Burgess, Rt 1, Oakboro, NC
DOD 4/1/1963 at 9:30pm
Cause of death: Arteriosclerotic heart disease (duration 5 yrs)
Buried: 4/3/1963 at Barbee Grove Baptist Church, Oakboro, Stanly County, NC


NC Death Certificate #286, Registration District #84-01, Certificate #12, Mrs. Abagail Boone (sic), DOD 2/17/1940 in Big Lick, Stanly County, NC
Female, White, Married to P.L. Boone, DOB 4/4/1886 in NC, 52 yrs, 10 mos, 12 days old
Occuaption: Housewife
Father: Jonah Aldridge, born in Stanly County, NC
Mother: Martha McIntyre, born in Anson County, NC
Informant: P.L. Boone, Oakboro, NC
DOD 2/19/1940 at (blank)
Cause of death: Myocarditis (duration 3 yrs)
Buried: 2/18/1940 in Barbee's Grove

I couldn't find any death records on Martha Elizabeth Boone except for her tombstone.

I couldn't find any death records on Mary Catherine Boone except for her tombstone.


NC Death Certificate #443, Registration District #8403, Certificate #3, William C. Burleson, DOD 1/10/1935 in Endy, Albemarle, Stanly County, NC
Male, White, Married to Kate Boone, DOB 8/3/1869 in Albemarle, Stanly County, NC, 65 yrs 9 mos 22 days old
Occupation: Farmer
Father: Wesley Burleyson, born in Albemarle, Stanly County, NC
Mother: Sarah Paide (sic), born in Albemarle, Stanly County, NC
Informant: Jona Burleyson (sic), Albemarle, NC
DOD 1/10/1935
Cause of death: No doctor, creeping paralysis, other factor "cronic acathis" (sic, ?)
Buried: 1/11/1935 (?) in Pleasant Grove

I couldn't find any death records on John Franklin Boone, Sr. except for his tombstone.

NC Death Certificate #12585, Registration District #8406, Certificate #29, Mrs. Mollie Eliza Boone, DOD 6/14/1945 in R #4, Albemarle, Stanly County, NC (at home, been living there 10 yrs)
Female, White, Widowed, Spouse was John Boone (decsd), DOB 2/6/1877 in Stanly County, NC, 68 yrs 4 mos 8 days old
Occupation: Housewife
Father: Haught Davis, born in Anson County, NC
Mother: Julina ??, born in  (blank)
Informant: Mrs. D.M. Nabe, Albemarle, NC
DOD 6/14/1945
Cause of death: Cerebral hemorrhage due to hypertension and arteriosclerosis
Buried: 6/15/1945 in Rehobeth

NC Death Certificate #19230, Registration District #84-00, Registrar's Certificate #433, Rebecca Louise Whitley, DOD 5/27/1957 in Rt 1, Oakboro, Stanly County, NC (at home)
Female, White, Widowed, Spouse was Masirah Whitley, DOB 3/1/1868 in NC, 89 yrs old
Occupation: Housewife
Father: William Whitley (sic, William Peter Boone), Mother: Mary Smith, Informant: Mrs. D.S. Little, Oakboro, NC
DOD 5/27/1957 at (blank)
Cause of death: Coronary Thrombosis (duration 30 mins) due to arteriosclerosis (duration 10 yrs)
Burial: 5/28/1957 in Smith Grove P.B.C. (sic), in Stanly County, NC

NC Death Certificate #94, Registration District #84-01, Certificate #7, M.A. Whittey (sic, it's M.A. Whitley), DOD 6/2/1936 in Big Lick, Stanly County, NC
Male, White, Married to Rebecca Whittey (sic, Rebecca Whitley), DOB 7/5/1869 in Stanly County, NC, 66 yrs 11 mos 17 days old
Occupation: None
Father: E.I. Whittey (sic), born in NC
Mother: Sarah Ann Gilbert, born in NC
Informant: Mrs. D.S. Little, Oakboro, NC
DOD 6/2/1936 at 7am
Cause of death: Coronary thrombosis (duration 6/1/1936)
Contributory Causes: Arteriosclerosis
Buried: 6/3/1936 at Smith Grove

NC Death Certificate #176, Registration District #80-09, Certificate #1, Mrs. Malinda Huneycutt, DOD: 2/19/1939 in RFD #1, Norwood, Tyson, Stanly County, NC (at home)
Female, White, Married to W.E. Huneycutt, DOB: 3/15/1973 in Stanly County, NC, 65 yrs, 11 mos, 4 days old
Occupation: Housework at home
Father: William Boone, born in Alamance County, NC
Mother: Mary Smith, born in Stanly County, NC
Informant: W.E. Huneycutt, RFD #1, Norwood, NC
DOD: 2/19/1939 at 6pm
Cause of death: Pulmonary Tuberculosis, diagnosed via x-ray and sputum
Burial: 2/21/1939 at Cottonville

We cannot find any death records for William Eli Huneycutt other than his tombstone.

I cannot find any death records for William E. Boone except for his tombstone. I lost track of his wife, Martha E. Unknown, and was unable to follow her after his death.

NC Death Certificate #35194, Registration District #84-00, Registrar's Certificate #230, George Henry Boone, DOD 12/10/1959, Rt #2, Norwood, Stanly County, NC (at home)
Male, White, Widowed, Spouse Lela Farmer, DOB 10/18/1878 in Stanly County, NC, 80 yrs old
Occupation: Retired farmer
Father: George Boone, Mother: Mary Jane Smith, Informant: Travis Boone, Norwood, NC
DOD 12/10/1959 at 9:15am
Cause of death: Coronary thrombosis (duration died instantly) due to arteriosclerotic heart disease (duration 6 mos)
Buried: 12/13/1959 in Cottonville, Stanly County, NC

NC Death Certificate #2349, Registration District #84-00, Registrar's Certificate #283, Liler Farmer Boone, DOD 1/24/1957, Rt 2, Norwood, Stanly County, NC (at home)
Female, White, Married to George H. Boone, DOB 3/26/1881 in NC, 75 yrs, 9 mos, 18 days old
Occupation: Domestic at home
Father: George Farmer, Mother: Betty Watkins, Informant: George H. Boone, Rt 2, Norwood, NC
DOD 1/24/1957 at 9:15am
Cause of death: Metastatic carcinoma of liver (duration 3 weeks) due to carcinoma of gastro - instestinal tract not determined
Buried: 1/25/1957 in Cottonville, Stanly County, NC 

NC Death Certificate #45679, Registration District #6300, Mrs. Julia Farmer, DOD 12/29/1972 in Sand Hill Nursing Centery, Pinehurst, Moore County, NC
Usual Residence: Rt #1, Norwood, Stanly County, NC
Female, White, Widowed, Spouse: Adam H. Farmer, DOB 5/7/1881 in NC, 91 yrs old
Occupation: Housewife homemaker
Father: William Andy Boone (sic ? Peter William Boone), Mother: Mary Smith, Informant: Mr. H.J. Farmer, Rt #1, Norwood, NC
DOD 12/29/1972 at 1pm
Cause of death: Arteriosclerosis (duration 15 yrs) due to senility
Buried: 12/31/1972 in Cottonville Baptist Church, Stanly County, NC

NC Death Certificate #30516, Registration District #84-80, Registrar's Certificate #124, Adam Huston Farmer, DOD 12/17/1953 in Stanly County Hospital, Albemarle, Stanly County, NC
Usual Residence: Rt #1, Norwood, Stanly County, NC
Male, White, Married, DOB 1/23/1875 in Stanly County, NC, 75 yrs old
Occupation: Retired salesman and farmer
Father: George Farmer, Mother: Betty Watkins, Informant: Mrs. A.H. Farmer, Rt #2, Norwood, NC
DOD 12/17/1953 at (blank)
Cause of death: Uremia due to kidney failure due to congestive heart failure, other significant factors were cerebral vascular accident
Buried: 12/19/1953 in Cottonville Baptist Church, Stanly County, NC







Sunday, April 07, 2013

Remodeling My Bathroom

We decided to remodel our bathrooms. Mine is in the Master Bedroom and Stan's is the hall bath. We had done ceramic tile floors back nearly 8 years ago when we moved in but we hadn't done anything else to them since. The cabinetry was still in good condition but we wanted to get rid of the laminate countertops and replace with granite. That also meant new drop in sinks which led to new sink hardware. We replace the commodes. We decided the showers were still too good to replace them at this time. In my bathroom we had to tear down the wallpaper. Stan had to fix and sand the walls and we painted it to match the bedroom. In his bathroom, he sanded the painted and then re-painted. The mirrors are thrift store finds. They had been old dresser mirrors. We got the biggest one. in my dressing room, for $15. Stan's cost $10.

Stan did all this on his own while working too. He got the bathrooms done in really record time although it's never fast enough for me. The dust and the mess led to significant cleaning problems. Stan took pity of me and hired a crew to come in afterwards to do a top-to-bottom clean to get rid of that sheetrock dust. He took a couple of days off to try and get some stuff completed. Here are the results:







The medicine cabinets that we found at Lowe's and Home Depot are so cheaply and poorly made it was ridiculous. But without another choice I had to get it. But I had a dream on how to use it and Stan made it a reality! He made a box with 1" x 6" boards with a backer board. Then he slid the Lowe's medicine cabinet into the box on the wall and screwed a couple of screws in the back to the backer board.













Sentimental Sunday - The Baby Dress

Sentimental Sunday is a daily blogging prompt used by many genealogy bloggers at Geneabloggers.com to help them post content on their sites. To participate in Sentimental Sunday, simply create a post in which you discuss a sentimental story or memory about an ancestor, or maybe even a family tradition that touches you.

My maternal Grandmother, Geneva Margaret Lamb Reese, made this baby dress and ruffled panties of turquoise chiffon and lace for her first grandchild, me! She also made a blue velveteen coat and bonnet to go with it.





This is me wearing the little dress.


My Mom and Dad had 2 more girls after me, Elaine and Melinda. They also wore the dress, coat and bonnet. Here is a picture of Elaine wearing the dress to a  Kindergarden Christmas party in Iuka, MS. My Mother is helping us open our presents. She got pregnant with Melinda in Iuka, MS. Unfortunately, I don't have a picture of Melinda wearing the dress.



Fast forward 18 yrs later to 1977 and I married Stan. Elaine married Stan's brother, Ronnie, 2 yrs later. Elaine and Ronnie had a daughter and son, Jenny and Luke. I took Jenny, in 1984, to have her portrait made wearing the same dress. Here she is.


Jenny is now 29 yrs old. I still have the dress, coat and bonnet.  Luke and his wife, Hannah, have a little girl, Savannah. I would give anything if I had remembered to have her portrait made in the dress when she was little enough!

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