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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Captain Michael Robert Gaffney and Mary "Polly" Smith

I was doing some research for a good friend of mine who is descended from Capt. Michael Robert Gaffney and Mary "Polly" Smith. I thought I would share it on my blog. I am NOT related to this family, neither is Stan. I did this for our friend.

Robert Michael Gaffney (aka Michael Robert Gaffney) was born 9/29/1775 in Granard County, Ireland to William Gaffney and Nancy Riley.

Michael Gaffney went through a great ordeal coming to the States. He was forced to leave Ireland because he fought for freedom. Rumor has it that Gaffney left Ireland due to threats of imprisonment after he was involved in the Great Rebellion of 1795. At the age of 19, he was "forced to relocate his passions and hope for humanity for South Carolina". Gaffney left for America on July 31, 1797 on the ship "Snow Palace" to New York City. In the "History of Gaffney" it says that in his travels from Dublin, Ireland on 31 July 1797, he encountered severe weather and pirate attacks. Arriving in New York late October 1797. He noted the rudeness of the Dutch settlers toward the Irish and the inhospitable climate in New York.

U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
Original data: Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2010, Michael Gaffney, 1798-1802, to America, Source Publication Code: 3250.7
Name: Michael Gaffney
Year: 1798-1802
Place: America
Source Publication Code: 3250.7
Primary Immigrant: Gaffney, Michael
Annotation: Port and date of arrival, or place and date of application or admission. Many records give country of origin, place of residence in America, and occupation.
Source Bibliography: HOLCOMB, BRENT H. South Carolina Naturalizations, 1783-1850. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1985. 255p. Page: 223


Images Of America, Cherokee County, South Carolina
Cherokee Historical And Preservation Society
Copyright 2003
Published by Arcadia Publishing, Charleston SC
ISBN 978-0-7385-1431-4
Pg 7
Introduction
"Settlers, attracted by mineral springs, began to move into the area now known as Cherokee County in the 1750s. They found that the friendly Congaree, Catawba, and Cherokee Indian tribes had already settled close by and were sharing this area for hunting.

Michael Gaffney, born in Granard, Ireland in 1775, immigrated to America in 1797, and arrived in New York and remained there for a couple of years before moving to Charleston, South Carolina. Gaffney, in search of a more healthy and fertile land, journeyed to this area and established a homestead here in 1804. He married Mary "Polly" Smith of the Smith's Ford family. They built a tavern and lodging for travelers at what soon became known as "Gaffney's Cross Roads". This location was selected because of two major roads - one from the mountains of North Carolina and the north-south route from Charlotte to Georgia.

He left New York aboard the ship "Marion". He arrived in Charleston, SC on Feb.3, 1800. He spent the summer there. He contracted yellow fever in Charleston, SC, where he nearly died but was nursed back to health by a Dr. Riley (or Dr. Reilly). He would later give his three daughters the middle name of Riley to honor Dr. Riley. It was also his mothers' maiden name and she may have been a relative of Dr. Riley. In Dec. 1800 he sold his business, and moved upstate. He built a home in 1804 where the Mills Gap Road from the Blue Ridge Mountains crossed the Georgia Road from Charlotte, NC which was called Gaffney Cross Roads.

He owned a store with co-partner, Mr. McCarton, in the area of upstate South Carolina that would become Gaffney, SC.

SC Department of Archives and History
Series: S213003
Volume: 003N
Page: 00508
Item: 000
Date: 1/13/1803
Description: MCCARTAN, THOMAS AND MICHAEL GAFFNEY TO PETER GAILLARD, BILL OF SALE FOR A SLAVE NAMED DICK.
Names indexed: DICK (SLAVE); GAFFNEY, MICHAEL; GAILLARD, PETER; MCCARTAN, THOMAS

In the HISTORY OF THE SARRATT FAMILY By Noble John Sarratt, 1809-1897 The first store established in this section was that owned by Mike Gaffney and his co- partner, McCarton. It was located at first a few miles west of the point where Gaffney City now stands, not far from Thickety Creek. Mr. McCarton came ahead of Mr. Gaffney and established the store. “By this time,” Mr. Gaffney says in his journal, “I was beginning to get pretty tired of Charleston. It made me think of going to my partner, a Mr. McCarton, who lived about 250 miles up the country north-west of Charleston.” He left Charleston on Dec. 11, 1800, and arrived at “our new home in six days,” which was Dec. 18, 1800.

On July 21,1803, some months after he established his store at the Crossroads, he married Mary Smith (aka Polly Smith) who resided near Smith’s Ford. Mary Smith was born 7/1/1783 at Smith's Ford to John Smith and Sarah Guyton. John Smith was born Feb, 1748 in Virginia to Henry Smith and Amelia "Amy" Hampton and died 12/31/1834 in Smith's Ford, SC. Sarah Guyton was born 12/29/1763 in Baltimore County, MD to Joseph Guyton, Sr. and Hannah Whitaker and died 4/17/1800 in York County, SC.


Here is the will of John Smith, father of Mary Smith Gaffney.





Mike Gaffney purchased 805 acres of land from John McKie on January 20, 1804 for $600.00. He then constructed his home, a store and trading post at the corner of present day N. Granard Street and Baker Boulevard. This intersection was a Native American trail and wagon road. The location was perfect for growth because the two major roads met there, the one from the mountains of North Carolina to Charleston and the other from Charlotte into Georgia. It became known as Gaffney's Crossroads. Established in Spartanburg County as Limestone Springs, the town was granted a US Post Office on May 14, 1836, and its first Postmaster was Mr. William Murray. On April 8, 1879, the US Post Office Department officially changed the name to Gaffney City, with Postmaster M.M. Glover. In 1892, the name was officially changed to simply Gaffney.

The store was moved from its first location to the place known as Gaffney's Cross Roads, now the city of Gaffney, SC. He built his first home, a small log cabin, in 1804 where the Mills Gap Road from the Blue Ridge Mountains crossed the Georgia Road which was called Gaffney Cross Roads. Their first child, Nancy Riley Gaffney, was probably born there on 6/1/1804. A handhewn log home was donated to the city of Gaffney by the Gaffney Bicentennial Commission and Committees on June 23, 2006. Most of the hand hewn logs are from the house of Michael Gaffney built on 1804. 35° 4.431′ N, 81° 38.908′ W

Michael Gaffney was the first man to make bricks in Cherokee County, S.C. He was the first man to have a brick chimney; and to have a weather boarded house. Anthony Sarratt bought brick from Gaffney at the cost of $6.00 per thousand to build a chimney for his house. Michael was the first man to have a store in which one could buy dry goods in the county.

There were no other buildings at the site except his barn, his home, and the store, which also served as a tavern and lodging house for travelers. The store flourished. As the first little frame shacks were built together around the crossroads, promoters took over Limestone Springs, which they ballyhooed as the South's Saratoga. It was the heyday of mineral therapeutic treatment. Low country plantation owners, plagued every summer by malaria, which they called "country fever" and believed was caused by "miasmas," flocked here to drink the water. A $75,000 hotel was built in 1835, and the town assumed the characteristics of a resort. Wealthy patients paid for the sumptuousness to which they were accustomed at home. The town also became noted for its tilting tournaments, cockfights, and gander pullings in which a plucked and greased gander was suspended mid-air and exposed to competing horsemen who tried to snatch off its head while riding past at a hard gallop. (South Carolina: A Guide to the Palmetto State by the Federal Writers' Project, 1949, pg 349.) The Limestone Springs hotel failed in 1845 and was soon was converted to the offices of Limestone College, a women's institution of learning. t was the first women's college in South Carolina and one of the first in the United States. Founders Dr. Thomas Curtis and son William Curtis, distinguished scholars from England, sought to provide educational opportunities to those who had not otherwise had them. It is the third oldest college in South Carolina. The railroad was built in 1873 and the tracks were surveyed, streets laid out, and homes and business built. Gaffney was incorporated in 1857.


A History Of Spartanburg County, DR. J. B. 0. Landrum, pg 48
Another picture of this section at the same period is found in the diary of Michael Gaffney, founder of the town of Gaffney, who trading post and tavern at the intersection of two established trading paths came to be called Gaffney's Cross-Roads, later Gaffney's Old Field, later still Gaffney. In 1802 he settled in that part of Spartanburg District which is now Cherokee County. His diary has been preserved and it gives a very clear picture of his impressions as he passed from Charleston to Smith's Ford on Broad River. A native of Ireland and possess of some means, he was disappointed, as he made his way up from Charleston, to find the interior "low and unhealthy" and the people "yellow, poor, and sickly." He had anticipated finding in the foothill region "a fine country, but was surprised to find it poor, sandy, rocky, and hilly." Most of the people were poor and were dressed, peasant style, in hunting shirts and trousers, home-woven of coarse cotton yarn. "Every farmer or planter," he noted, "is his own shoemaker, tanner, tailor, carpenter, brazier, and, in fact, everything else. Everything comes by the farmer and his family. It is the business of the wife and daughter to pick cotton and have it brought home, pick it from the seed, spin it, weave it, and make it ready for your back. Some of the girls made very handsome cloth. The women in this country live the poorest lives of any people in the world. Here they must do everything from cooking to plowing, and after that they have no more life than Indian squaws. They hardly ever sit down to the table with their husbands, but wait on them like menial servants.”



He built his home in 1804 where the Mills Gap Road from the Blue Ridge Mountains crossed the Georgia Road which was called Gaffney Cross Roads. Although there were no other buildings at the site except his barn, his home, and the store, which also served as a tavern and lodging house for travelers. The store flourished and soon a resort hotel was built near Limestone Springs. The place's name was changed from Gaffney's Crossroads to Gaffney’s Old Field, and still later it was called Gaffney’s. The site was later incorporated as The Town of Gaffney City. In the "History of Gaffney" it states that many of the streets in Gaffney, SC were named after family members. There was a hotel that soon was converted to the offices of Limestone College, a women's institution of learning. The railroad was built in 1873 and the tracks were surveyed, streets laid out, and homes and business built. Gaffney was incorporated in 1857.



Let's look at how South Carolina developed by looking at some maps.

SC backcountry election districts of 1778. During the Revolutionary War, in 1778, the new Whig Government of South Carolina passed legislation to establish new election districts. The net effect was to increase the representation of the SC Backcountry in the Legislature. This was done mainly to appease the Backcountry settlers, many of whom had strong Loyalist tendencies, and encourage them to support the new State Government in Charleston. Many people who had been Loyalist leaders in SC during the events of 1775 had acquiesced to Whig rule. Some of them, such as John Mayfield of Browns Creek (Ninety-Six Judicial District) even ran for office in the new districts and won election to the SC House of Representatives. Mayfield was elected from the Upper or Spartan District (between the Broad and Saluda Rivers) and took his seat in February 1780. In 1785, the new counties of Spartanburg and Union would be created from this Upper District.




SC Districts 1769-1784






SC District and County Courts 1786-1791






SC Districts, 1791-1799




A map of Spartanburg County, SC in 1820. Spartanburg is marked in red in the center of the map. The "Gafney Tavern" is marked in red in the upper right corner.




Cherokee county was formed in 1897 from parts of York, Union, and Spartanburg Counties. If I say a Gaffney was born in Spartanburg County, SC it means they were born in a part of Spartanburg County that became Cherokee County, SC in 1897.


Today's SC counties




The county of Cherokee showing it's townships.





Let's also look at some of the old Indian Trails that became wagon roads for the pioneer settlers who began to move into upstate SC. The Great Wagon Road (GWR) is in red. The Wilderness Road is in blue dashed lines. Scots-Irish (Ulster-Irish), and German farmers migrating along the GWR thru VA began settling the counties near the north end of the Old Cherokee Path in the 1750s. However, during part of the French and Indian War 1754-1763 they decided to leave the Washington County, VA area. Some settlers were pushing beyond the Proclamation line protecting Indians from intruders. From the first contact with Europeans the Cherokee Indians had settlements called the Lower Cherokee Villages in the NW part of SC and part of GA. The most prominent was Keowee in what became Oconee County, SC. Another was Tugaloo near what became Toccoa, GA. Several important Indian trails converged on these villages, including the south end of the Old Cherokee Path. The Cherokee sided with the British during the Am Rev War. By 1777 Patriot forces attacked and drove the Cherokee from SC, and Tugaloo, GA.





Old roads and trails showing over a modern map of the states and counties.


Old roads and trails showing over a modern map of the states and counties.




The Wagon Road was the Colonies' greatest highway, stretching from Pennsylvania down through the Shenandoah Valley to North Carolina. The majority of Mecklenburg's early settlers were Scotch Irish Presbyterians who arrived at the port of Philadelphia then made their way south via the Great Wagon Road. In Charlotte this trail became Tryon Street, named after Colonial governor William Tryon. One ancient trail was by the 1750s known as the Trading Path, because traders from eastern Virginia followed it south to trade with the Indians. 4 In North Carolina U. S. Highway 29 follows part of this route. A spur of the path joined the Great Wagon Road somewhere near Winston Salem. The other trail was part of a route that took traders northwest to the Blue Ridge from Charleston. A "mixed multitude of English, Scotch, Germans, Huguenots and Swiss" followed the route up from Charleston over the years to settle in Mecklenburg. 5 This trail became Trade Street. At the crossroads the village grew.

These maps show the Indian trails that became pioneer roads that brought settlers into the upstate and Michael Gaffney was poised to make his fortune.


The Gaffney Ledger dated 10/27/1899 reported that William Gaffney wrote his son, Michael Gaffney, in 1798. The letter is dated "Balymoris, Ireland March 19, 1798." and the manuscript was still legible and the paper in good condition. This letter had been in the possession of the Gaffney family ever since it arrived at its destination. The letter was addressed to "Mr. Mich'l Gaffney, at Mrs. Morris Skinner, No. 22 Water Street, New York, America," and was not encased in an envelope but folded and sealed with sealing wax."


The Gaffney's had 9 children:
1) Nancy Riley Gaffney (DOB 1 Jun 1804 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 5/23/1836 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married John Carruth Henderson (DOB 10/9/1801 in Lincoln County, NC; DOD 11/17/1833 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC)

2) Lucinda Gaffney (DOB 3/30/1807 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 2/17/1899 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married Joseph Austill (aka Joseph Austell) (DOB 1810-1812 in SC; DOD 3/15/1867 in Spartanburg County, SC)

3) Melinda Riley Gaffney (DOB 5/19/1809 in Gaffney Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 7/4/1930 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married a McNeil or McNeel.

4) James Madison Smith Gaffney (DOB 12/26/1811 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 8/12/1844 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married Sarah "Sallie" Minerva Jones (DOB 4/1826 in SC; DOD ? in ? )

5) Henry Green Gaffney, Esquire (aka Squire Gaffney) (DOB 2/1/1816 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 7/17/1900 in Cherokee County, SC) married Sarah Elizabeth Logan (DOB 7/15/1816 in Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 9/2/1881 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC)

Obituary of Henry Green Gaffney
The Gaffney Ledger, 8/21/1900 Squire Gaffney is dead. Henry G. Gaffney was born on Feb. 2, 1816, and was therefore in his eighty fifth year. He was a son of Michael Gaffney, one of the pioneer settlers of this part of the country. He had a family of eleven children, seven of whom are still living: Mrs. A.V. Montgomery, Mrs. J.A. Nance, Mrs. R.R. Wilkins, Mrs. J.E. Gaines, Mrs. W.L. Johnson, J.J. Gaffney and H. M. Gaffney of Gaffney, and Mrs. R.A. Robertson of Spartanburg. The pall bearers were the following young gentlemen, all grandsons of Gaffney: P.V. Gaffney, D.M. Gaines, Earnest Nance, William Johnson, T. Roland Gaines, and Claude Gaffney.

6) Cornelius John Gaffney (DOB 7/9/1817 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 12/22/1883 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married Elizabeth Ross (DOB About 1831 in Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 4/1897 in Gaffney, Cherokee County, SC)

7) Dr. Gustavius Joseph Gaffney (DOB 4/1/1820 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 7/20/1894 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married Mary Jane Richmond Byars (DOB 2/19/1822 in SC; DOD 4/25/1885 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC)

8) William Godolphin Gaffney (DOB 11/21/1823 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 6/20/1894 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married Myra Ann Ross (DOB 2/19/1828 in SC; DOD About 1900 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC)

9) Thomas Westhaven Gaffney (DOB 10/8/1825 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 8/16/1887 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC) married E. Misseniah Burns (DOB 5/25/1827 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC; DOD 5/18/1908 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC).

Obituary of Thomas Westhaven Gaffney
24 Aug 1887"Thomas Gaffney, Senior, died at his home near Gaffney City last week. He was a quiet man in deportment, retiring in disposition and staid close at home.  He was about 65 years old. He attended well to his own affairs and watched after the interest of his family with constant attention. In all, his dealings with neighbors he was honest and honorable. He was a good true man and will be much missed by his wife and children."

Obituary of Missiniah Burns Gaffney
The Gaffney Ledger "Messiniah Gaffney (sic), an aged lady who lives in the northern part of Gaffney, had the misfortune to be severely burned Thursday evening. She was alone in the house at the time, and it is supposed that her clothing caught from her pipe as she was smoking. The servant who lives with her heard her fall to the ground and went to her rescue. With the assistance of Rev. I. N. Stone, succeeding in extinguishing the flames, but not before [the] old lady was severely burned. Both Rev. Stone and the servant had their hands painfully burned in endeavoring to extinguish the flames. Mrs. Gaffney is the mother of Adolphus Gaffney, M.L. Ross and Worth Little. Dr. Littlejohn, who was called to attend Gaffney, says that her injuries are serious and that he has little hope of her recovery. She is more than eighty years of age. Gaffney died yesterday morning at 10 o'clock from the effects of the burns. The funeral will take place at Providence Baptist Church."



1810 U.S. Census of Spartanburg, South Carolina; Roll: 61; Page: 398; Image: 0181420; Family History Library Film: 00362, "Michl Gaffney" Name: Michl Gaffney
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Spartanburg, South Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 26 thru 44 : 1 (see below)
Free White Persons - Females - Under 10: 3
Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 1
Numbers of Slaves: 8
Number of Household Members Under 16: 3
Number of Household Members Over 25: 1
Number of Household Members: 13
Free White Persons - Males - 26 thru 44 : 1 (Robert Michael Gaffney was 35 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Females - Under 10: 3 (Nancy Riley Gaffney was 6 yrs old, Lucinda Gaffney was 3 yrs old, Melinda Riley Gaffney was 1 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 1 (Mary "Polly" Smith was 27 yrs old)
Numbers of Slaves: 8
Number of Household Members Under 16: 3
Number of Household Members Over 25: 1
Number of Household Members: 13



A successful merchant, Gaffney was commissioned by S.C. Gov. Charles Pinckney to form a militia during the War of 1812.

Index to War of 1812 Pension Application Files
Copyright © 2013 Debbie Duay, Fort Lauderdale, FL, http://www.learnwebskills.com/patriot/war1812indexg.htm.
Gaffney, Michael........1775-1854.....SC......Spartanburg County, SC......Smith, Mary Polly..........DOM 21 Jul 1803


Searching For the Forgotten War - 1812: United States of America
By Patrick Richard Carstens and Timothy L. Sanford
2012
Copyright 2011
ISBN 978-1-4568-6753-9
XLibris.com



The Cherokee Chronicle, Vol 22, No. 91, Thursday, May 2, 2013, pgs 1 & 4
"Michael Gaffney's Wife Found Guilty Of Murder"
By Jerry Hancock for The Cherokee Chronicle
It seems that Cherokee County's oft-violent history did not skip the found family of the City of Gaffney. In fact, Michael Gaffney's wife, Mary Polly Smith Gaffney, was herself charged and convicted in the killing of a family slave and paid a fine for her crime.

Michael Gaffney married Miss Smith on July 21, 1803 near Smith's Ford. The couple prospered and built up several businesses in the area, including a tavern in what is not the City of Gaffney. They also became the parents of nine children.

On or about January 13, 1817, Polly Gaffney allegedly killed a female slave named Phyllis who worked for the family. Phyllis was the slave and legal property of Polly's husband, Michael Gaffney, at the time of the murder, which was said to be very brutal. The female slave was killed with a single knife wound that was 2 inches in length and 6 inches deep, stabbed under the left arm above the rib cage, historical accounts reveal. Her body was allegedly mutilated afterwards.

Polly Gaffney was allowed bail on the charge of $1,000, which was signed for by her husband. A man named Robert Stacey, who evidently served as some type of judge or magistrate at the time, swore out the murder warrant against Mrs. Gaffney.

The historical file of this case states that when the case was tried, Mrs. Gaffney was found guiltyand ordered to pay a 50-pound fine for the murder, along with the court costs. These charges were paid by the Gaffney family.

In fact, Polly never spent any time in jail whatsoever, primarily because she was expecting her sixth child at the time. The child was subsequently born July 9, 1917. (Cornelius John Gaffney)

The pound sterling note was worth $4.25 in U.S. currency back in 1818 so, in fact, Mrs. Gaffney paid a fine of $212.50 on the murder charge. There is no record of how much the court costs were.

There is a note in the historical record which pointed out that the murder weapon, a knife, was bought by the Gaffney family for a price of 10 cents.

This account was not widely known at the time of the killing but appeared in public several years later in a book titled, "Rise Till Amerika, 1851-1855" edited by Sigrid Laurell. The book was subsequently translated from its original Swedish to English and re-titled, "Travels In America, 1851-1855" by Rosalie Roos. (Ms. Roos was an author and artist who later did a very famous lithography of the "Limestone Springs Female High School" which was later named Limestone College.)

Michael and Polly's grandson, Michael Gaffney II, also wrote a book in 1854 filled with anecdotes and updates in the life of his famous family. That book says that one of the oddities in the life of Michael Gaffney was the prominent role which the month of September played; he was born in September, commissioned a Captain in September by Gov. Pickney; and also died in September.

No photograph or portrait was ever made of Michael Gaffney. There is no written statement as to why an image was never made, but word of mouth had it that it was due to certain superstitions of the city's founder.

Michael Gaffney almost lost his life while a resident of Charleston prior to his marriage. He became bedridden with some form of fever, but was nursed back to health by a doctor named Reilly, who was from Killeshands, England near Gaffney's hometown. In fact, historians say that it is likely that the two were distantly related because Michael's mother's maiden name was Reilly.

As a tribute, the middle name of all Michael Gaffney's daughters was Reilly, in memory of his mother, and the doctors who saved his life.

(Sources: Cherokee County Public Library; Susan Thomas at Kennedy Room, Spartanburg County Public Library; Marion Chandler at State of South Carolina Department of Archives; local historian Robert Ivey; and researched Ian Lecroy"



1820 U.S. Census of Spartanburg, Spartanburg, South Carolina; Page: 282; NARA Roll: M33_120; Image: 348, "Mahl Gafney"
Name: Mahl Gafney
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Spartanburg, Spartanburg, South Carolina
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons - Males - Under 10: 4
Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 26 thru 44: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 15: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 26 thru 44: 1
Slaves - Males - Under 14: 5
Slaves - Males - 14 thru 25: 1
Slaves - Males - 26 thru 44: 3
Slaves - Females - Under 14: 4
Slaves - Females - 14 thru 25: 2
Slaves - Females - 26 thru 44: 1
Number of Persons - Engaged in Agriculture: 10
Number of Persons - Engaged in Commerce: 1
Number of Persons - Engaged in Manufactures: 1
Free White Persons - Under 16: 5
Free White Persons - Over 25: 2
Total Free White Persons: 9
Total Slaves: 16
Total All Persons - White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 25
Free White Persons - Males - Under 10: 4 (Cornelius John Gaffney was 3 yrs old, Henry Green Gaffney was 5 yrs old, James Madison Gaffney was 9 yrs old, ? )
Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 1 ( ? )
Free White Persons - Males - 26 thru 44: 1 (Robert Michael Gaffney was 45 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 15: 1 (Melinda Riley Gaffney was 11 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 1 (Lucinda Gaffney was 13 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Females - 26 thru 44: 1 (Mary "Polly" Smith was 37 yrs old)
Slaves - Males - Under 14: 5
Slaves - Males - 14 thru 25: 1
Slaves - Males - 26 thru 44: 3
Slaves - Females - Under 14: 4
Slaves - Females - 14 thru 25: 2
Slaves - Females - 26 thru 44: 1
Number of Persons - Engaged in Agriculture: 10
Number of Persons - Engaged in Commerce: 1
Number of Persons - Engaged in Manufactures: 1
Free White Persons - Under 16: 5
Free White Persons - Over 25: 2

9 Male Slaves
7 Female Slaves
16 Total Slaves



1830 U.S. Census of Spartanburg County, South Carolina; Page: 320; NARA Series: M19; Roll Number: 171; Family History Film: 0022505
Name: Captain Michael Gassey [Captain Michael Gafney]
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Spartanburg, South Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 2 (See below)
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 8
Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 4
Slaves - Males - 36 thru 54: 2
Slaves - Females - Under 10: 11
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 3
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 6
Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54: 2
Free White Persons - Under 20: 6
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 9
Total Slaves: 36
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 45
Breakdown
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 2 (Thomas Westhaven Gaffney was 4 yrs old and William Godolphin Gaffney was 7 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 2 (Gustavius Joseph Gaffney was 10 yrs old, Cornelius John Gaffney was 13 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2 (Henry Green Gaffney was 15 yrs old, James Madison Gaffney was 19 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1 (Robert Michael Gaffney was 55 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1 (Melinda Riley Gaffney was 21 yrs old and never married)
Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1 (Mary "Polly" Smith was 47 yrs old)
1 Male head of family
2 Male adult children
4 Male children
7 Males
1 Female head of family
1 Female adult child
2 Total White Females
Parents and 7 children still living at home
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 8
Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 4
Slaves - Males - 36 thru 54: 2
Slaves - Females - Under 10: 11
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 3
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 6
Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54: 2
Free White Persons - Under 20: 6
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 9
Total Slaves: 36
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 45

14 Males all of working age
11 Females of working age
11 Females under working age (pickaninnies)
36 Total slaves

14 Males
22 Females
36 Total slaves




1840 U.S. Census of Spartanburg County, South Carolina; Roll: 515; Page: 152; Image: 315; Family History Library Film: 0022511
Name: Michael Gaffney
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Spartanburg, South Carolina
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2 (see below for breakdown)
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 60 thru 69: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 50 thru 59: 1
Slaves - Males - Under 10: 5
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 6
Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 4
Slaves - Males - 36 thru 54: 3
Slaves - Females - Under 10: 4
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 4
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 10
Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54: 4
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 25
Free White Persons - Under 20: 3
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 3
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total Slaves: 40
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 48
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2 (Thomas Westhaven Gaffney was 15 yrs old, William Godolphin Gaffney was 17 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 2 (Gustavius Joseph Gaffney was 20 yrs old, Cornelius John Gaffney was 23 yrs old, Henry Green Gaffney was 25 yrs old and James Madison Gaffney was 29 yrs old. Probably one was James Madison Gaffney who died in 1844.)
Free White Persons - Males - 60 thru 69: 1 (Robert Michael Gaffney was 65 yrs old)
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1 (Possible grandchild?)
Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 1 (Melinda Riley Gaffney would have been 31 yrs old but she died in 1830, Lucinda Gaffney was 37 yrs old and Nancy Riley Gaffney was 39 yrs old but they were both married. But Lucinda Gaffney's husband died in 1835 so maybe she was living back at home.) Free White Persons - Females - 50 thru 59: 1 (Mary "Polly" Smith was 57 yrs old)
Slaves - Males - Under 10: 5
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 6
Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 4
Slaves - Males - 36 thru 54: 3
Slaves - Females - Under 10: 4
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 4
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 10
Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54: 4
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 25
Free White Persons - Under 20: 3
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 3
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total Slaves: 40
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 48

..9 Children too young to work (Pickaninnies means too young to pick cotton, "They ain't pickin' any.")
31 Children and adults, Male and Female, old enough to work (10-54 yrs of age)
40 Total Slaves

13 Male Slaves of working age
18 Female Slaves of working age
31 Total Slaves of working age
..9 Pickaninnies
40 Total Slaves




1850 U.S. Census of Spartanburg County, South Carolina; Roll: M432_858; Page: 249B and 250A; Image: 504 and 505, Lines 42 next page Lines 1-9, "H.G. Gafney" (sic)
H.G. Gafney, 40 yrs old (DOB 1810), M(ale), W(hite), Farmer, Born in SC
M. Gafney, 75 yrs old (DOB 1775), M, W, Farmer, $1,500 Real Estate Value, Born in SC
Mary Gafney, 67 yrs old (DOB 1783), F, W, Born in SC
Thomas Gafney (sic), 25 yrs old (DOB 1825), M, W, Farmer, Born in SC
Minnie Gafney, 22 yrs old (DOB 1828), F, W, Born in SC
Joseph Gafney, 10 yrs old (DOB 1840), M, W, Born in SC (son of H.G.'s brother, James Madison Gaffney who had died)
Thomas Gafney, 8 yrs old (DOB 1842), M, W, Born in SC (son of H.G.'s brother, James Madison Gaffney who had died)
Charles Gafney, 1 yrs old (DOB 1849), M, W, Born in SC
Martha Gafney, 17 yrs old (DOB 1833), F, W, Born in SC
James Gafney, 17 yrs old (DOB 1833), M, W, Born in SC







STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
SPARTANBURG DISTRICT;

In the name of GOD, Amen, I, MICHAEL GAFFNEY, Of the District and State aforesaid, being weak of body, but sound of mind, memory and understanding, do make and declare the following and no other to be and contain in my last will and testament.

FIRST:
I give and bequeath to by beloved wife all the plantation or tract of land whereon I now reside, any slave or slaves whereof I may die possessed, not exceeding fifteen, to be selected by herself; all my bank and railroad stocks; Her selection from amongst my stock of horses and mules, not exceeding six in number; also her selection from amongst my stock of cattle, hogs and twenty head of sheep, not exceeding twenty head of cattle, thirty head of hogs and twenty head of sheep; all my household and kitchen furniture and as many implements of husbandry as may be necessary for her use, my blacksmith tools, four horse wagon, carry all, and barouche for and during her natural life and no longer, and at her death the whole to be disposed as of as herein after directed.

SECOND:
I have advance to my son CORNELIUS J GAFFNEY: five thousand nine hundred and eithy three dollars 97/100.
to my son HENRY G GAFFNEY; three thousand one hundred and sixty one dollars and 82/100
to my son: JOSEPH G GAFFNEY; four thousand three hundred and twenty five and 35/100
to my son THOMAS W GAFFNEY; two thousand nine hundred and eighty six dollars
to my son WILLIAM G GAFFNEY; four thousand seven hundred and seven dollars 16/100;
to my daughter LUCINDA R AUSTILL three thousand seven hundred and four dollars 15/100
to my daughter Nancy R HENDERSON now deceased, two thousand three hundred sixty eight and 50/100
to my late son JAMES M Gaffney, six hundred and sixty nine dollars and 15 /100 ;

and it is my will and desire that all the rest of the residue of my property and estate be so divided amongst and between my children that each have equal portion thereof taking into account the advancement heretofore made to them herein stated; The children of my daughter NANCY R HENDERSON, and my son JAMES M GAFFNEY, to take the shares that thier respective parents would have been entitled to if living, to be equally divided between and amongst them share and share alike.

THIRD:
It is further my will and desire that the portion which my grandsons JOSEPH G GAFFNEY and THOMAS E GAFFNEY may be entitled to under the provisions of this will in what ever form it may exist be placed in the hands of my said wife and the income thereof shall be by her appllied to their maintenance and education.. ( sons of JAMES MADSION GAFFNEY died 1844).

FOURTH:
It is further my will and desire that the property and estate herein before devised and bequeathed to my said wife (including the issue and increase of slaves) except what may have been consumed or worn out in use, shall on her death be equally be divided divided amongst and between all my children, the children of my daughter NANCY R HENDERSON, and my son JAMES M GAFFNEY, taking as before provided the share their parents would have respectively taken if living.

FIFTH:
IT is further my will that the provisions heretofore made for my daughter LUCINDA R AUSTELL be applies to her sole and separate use with the control of her husband, neither subject to his disposition nor liable for his debts on contract, and that upon her death the same be equally divided amongst and between her children, the children of a deceased child or children, taking the shares their parents would have taken if living.

Lastly:
I hereby nominate and appoint my sons JOSEPH G GAFFNEY and HENRY G GAFFNEY executors of this my last will and testament

WITNESS:
My hand and seal this 4th Day Of September One Thousand Eight Hundred Fifty Four;
MICHAEL GAFFNEY ( SEAL)

The foregoing was signed by the testator in our presence and declared by him to be and contain his last will and testament, and we in his presence and in the presence of each other subscribe our names hereto as witness of the due execution thereof;
BENJAMIN S MACARTHUR
LEMUEL FARANDES
JOHN W ROSS

WILL BOOK: D page 399, Box 32 package 37 recorded Dec 8 1854; R BOWDEN, O.S.D. (Ordinary of Spartanburg District).



Michael Gaffney died in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC on September 6, 1854.


FindAGrave.com
Capt. Michael Gaffney
Birth: Sep. 29, 1775, County Longford, Ireland
Death: Sep. 6, 1854
Family links:
Children:
Nancy Riley Gaffney Henderson (1804 - 1836)
Lucinda Riley Gaffney Austell (1807 - 1899)
Melinda Riley Gaffney McNeel (1809 - 1830)
James Madison Gaffney (1811 - 1844)
Henry Green Gaffney (1815 - 1900)
Cornelius John Gaffney (1817 - 1883)
Joseph Gustavius Gaffney (1820 - 1894)
William Godolphin Gaffney (1823 - 1882)
Thomas Westhaven Gaffney (1825 - 1887)
Burial: Michael Gaffney Family Cemetery, Cherokee County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Apomi
Record added: Jun 10, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14558705




1860 U.S. Census of Northern Division, Spartanburg, South Carolina; Roll: M653_1226; Page: 299; Image: 214; Family History Library Film: 805226, Line 1, "Mary Gaffney"
Mary Gaffney, 75 yrs old (DOB 1785), F(emale), W(hite), Farmer, $8,000 Real Estate Value, $4,750, Born in SC


Mary "Polly" Smith Gaffney died 8/11/1874 in Gaffney, Spartanburg County, SC.

FindAGrave.comMary Polly Smith Gaffney
Birth: Jul. 1, 1783
Death: Aug. 11, 1871
Mary was the wife of Capt.Michael Gaffney...
Blessing's always...
Family links:
Children:
Nancy Riley Gaffney Henderson (1804 - 1836)
Lucinda Riley Gaffney Austell (1807 - 1899)
Melinda Riley Gaffney McNeel (1809 - 1830)
James Madison Gaffney (1811 - 1844)
Henry Green Gaffney (1815 - 1900)
Cornelius John Gaffney (1817 - 1883)
Joseph Gustavius Gaffney (1820 - 1894)
William Godolphin Gaffney (1823 - 1882)
Thomas Westhaven Gaffney (1825 - 1887)
Burial: Michael Gaffney Family Cemetery, Cherokee County, South Carolina, USA
Created by: Apomi
Record added: Jun 10, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14558769

If you have any corrections or more information, please contact me at Mom25dogs@gmail.com


Gaffney Ledger Notices Of Marriages, Births And Deaths: 1894-1899 by Eddie Gorski Michael Gaffney, DOB 9/29/1775 in Ireland, Date of Article 8/3/1894
Michael Gaffney, DOD 9/6/1854, Date of Article 2/3/1894
Gaffney Ledger Notices of Marriage, Births And Deaths: 1900-1905 by Eddie Gorski H.G. Gaffney, DOB 2/2/1816, Father Michael Gaffney, Date of Article 8/21/1900
Henry Gaffney, Son of Michael Gaffney, DOD (blank), Date of Article 8/21/1900

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